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Why is there NOTHING (besides Gdansk and Szczecin) in former Prussia?


Sokrates 8 | 3,346
5 Jan 2011 #31
There you go, Wrocław as it was and as it is, the place still lost a lot but it got hit bad, some streets were mined as late as 1948.


  • 1945

  • 2010

  • 1945

  • 2010
Marynka11 4 | 675
5 Jan 2011 #32
No you need to flash boobs if you're hot, i'm just gonna contradict you for sport anyway.

You are not contradicting me. You are contradicting history.

And for all those who think we need to talk about Wroclaw in this thread: Wroclaw was not part of the East Prussia. If you look at the map, I think the OP was talking about the blue area in the north east. The western Poland is one of the better developed areas in the country.

weimar-republic.png - East Prussia
Bratwurst Boy 9 | 10,432
5 Jan 2011 #34
I think the OP was talking about the blue area in the north east.

The whole blue area was Prussia! ;) As in:

Why is there NOTHING in former Prussia?

Nice pics Sokrates and Iron :)
Marynka11 4 | 675
5 Jan 2011 #35
The whole blue area was Prussia! ;)

I know, the PO should have specified that the friend was from East Prussia. Malbork, Gdansk - definetely the eastern part of Prussia.
Ironside 50 | 10,910
5 Jan 2011 #36
I think the OP was talking about the blue area in the north east.

Elblag after the WWII:

red

..... on their way to fatherland :

red

Elbląg today:
guesswho 4 | 1,289
5 Jan 2011 #37
Gdansk

well Danzig was a part of Westpreussen. Ostpreussen is where Allenstein, Sensburg und Rastenburg are located.

..... on their way to fatherland :

You mean leaving their Vatterland :-)
PennBoy 76 | 2,436
5 Jan 2011 #38
You mean leaving their Vatterland :-)

No NO, on their way to Vatterland :-) They weren't called Recovered Territories Ziemie Odzyskane for nothing.
Ironside 50 | 10,910
5 Jan 2011 #39
Arsehole first!

Ah **** off with your sensitivity! They are well and alive what is more which can be said about a many polish people!
As for my family, as-holes like yourself did try to murder them, they were on the A-B list, but were a way too smart, Germans got only one of them....

You greatly underestimate the terror Germans were using against polish population and the hate the sow, be glad Germans are still alive and kicking, instead of tantrums, you could have simply ask kindly !
convex 20 | 3,978
5 Jan 2011 #40
Lets play nice...
guesswho 4 | 1,289
5 Jan 2011 #41
No NO, on their way to Vatterland :-) They weren't called Recovered Territories Ziemie Odzyskane for nothing.

That's why I always say, you can drink and have all kinds of fun with Poles but never discuss with them about history. That's an absolute no no, :-)
PennBoy 76 | 2,436
5 Jan 2011 #42
Supposedly you can't change a Hungarians view about history either, hmm, maybe that's why Poles and Hungarians love each other so much :-)


guesswho 4 | 1,289
5 Jan 2011 #43
maybe so, I've never met any Hungarians.
hague1cmaeron 14 | 1,377
5 Jan 2011 #44
Former Prussia was very sparsely populated, you have to take that into consideration. and when the borders shifted and Poland's population moved west and replaced the previous German population, the numbers coming in did not make up the numbers going out.

Under Prussian rule the government did invest quite a lot actually, because they were so determined to make the region attractive for migrating Germans, and they wanted to show the locals what they were capable of.
Ziemowit 13 | 4,236
5 Jan 2011 #45
... that the old prussian town of my grandparents, Breslau, is rebuild in it's old glory...

Breslau was Prussian between 1741 and 1945. Before that it was Austrian, Czech and Polish. I remember I told you once that the emperess of Austria could not sleep at nights to the end of her days since the moment the Prussians had conquered her beloved land of Silesia, leaving her only the small bits of the province, that is the areas around the town of Opava [now in the Czech Republic] and the Duchy of Cieszyn [now divided between Poland and the Czech Republic].
Harry
5 Jan 2011 #46
Why is there nothing in former East Prussia?

Central Koenigsberg in 1949
Central Koenigsberg in 1949

This is actually West Prussia but included to show what happened to Prussia:
Gdanska day or two after being taken by the Red Army
Gdansk day or two after being taken by the Red Army
OP Ksysia 25 | 430
5 Jan 2011 #47
I meant the North of today's Poland. I come from Lodz, and could always get a train to Krakow, Poznan, Katowice, Warszawa, I've done that often while in the Uni: drinks and student accomodation in Krakow, Indian clothes shops and theatres in Warsaw, friends in Katowice. It's full of things.

Magda went away to the north, and did not expect to find herself in such dessert - you get the Tricity, the coastline, and the next post of civilisation is... Warsaw.

Great effort byt the Prussians, eh? And to think that tourists are asking 'was all castles in Poland built by the Order, too?'
Softsong 5 | 495
5 Jan 2011 #48
There are also a lot of smaller interesting places on the border between Prussia and Russian Poland that Chopin visited. Estates and beautiful countryside that impressed him can be found in his diaries about school holidays in Poland and trips to Prussia.

This place Golub, has a small castle and lies between Pomerania and Warsaw. (My family lived in this area and also nearby Strasburg/Brodnica for about 250 years until WWII.

Closer to Warsaw there are other beautiful estates and manor houses. A lot of the area was made into a bread basket by Prussian and Dutch people who migrated from the Vistula River basin towards Warsaw and often farmed as tenants on the Polish noble's land. My ethnic German grandmother had her own farm and as a teenager did housekeeping on the Polish manor house nearby, Ugoszcz. She was born in 1896. The charm of these areas were the manor houses, countryside and farms. You may call it nothing, but feeding people is important, too.

en.chopin.nifc.pl/chopin/places/poland/id/573
OP Ksysia 25 | 430
5 Jan 2011 #49
You may call it nothing, but feeding people is important, too.

I gladly agree here.
Marynka11 4 | 675
5 Jan 2011 #50
well Danzig was a part of Westpreussen.

Gdansk was a free city. It was somewhat supervised by the League of Nations.

BTW, did you read "The Tin Drum"? Great book.
Bratwurst Boy 9 | 10,432
5 Jan 2011 #51
Gdansk was a free city. It was somewhat supervised by the League of Nations.

Against the will of their people!
And if the citizens wanted to keep their german passports they were forced to leave the town by the polish authorities.

"free city" my arse! Taken out of the Homeland by some treaty...
sascha 1 | 826
5 Jan 2011 #52
That's why I always say, you can drink and have all kinds of fun with Poles but never discuss with them about history. That's an absolute no no, :-)

Depends highly on the arrogance with which you present yourself. Your's completely out of place Mädchen.

In the middle of the 90's I traveled on business all over Poland and the poeple I met did not have any kind of reserves regarding history topic. They were keen on talking about it, especially in Schlesien but also in Gdansk.
Marynka11 4 | 675
5 Jan 2011 #53
BB, Word War I is over. Get over it and get some life.
guesswho 4 | 1,289
5 Jan 2011 #54
Gdansk was a free city. It was somewhat supervised by the League of Nations.

"Prussia was a region which before 1772 consisted of what was later known as East Prussia (Ostpreussen) with capital of Königsberg, a duchy since 1525, a kingdom of the Hohenzollern dynasty since 1701 and West Prussia (Westpreussen) with the Hanseatic cities of Danzig, Elbing, Thorn, and Culm, part of Poland referred to as Polish Prussia before 1772."

reocities.com/HotSprings/8008/eastpru.html

BTW, did you read "The Tin Drum"? Great book.

Of course I know "Die Blechtrommel" by Günter Grass. I watched the movie too.
Bratwurst Boy 9 | 10,432
5 Jan 2011 #55
BB, Word War I is over. Get over it and get some life.

"Word war I" ? ;)

I'm over it but you should get your facts straight...
Marynka11 4 | 675
5 Jan 2011 #56
I'm talking about in between the wars. It was under Prussia rule after the partitions, that's true.
guesswho 4 | 1,289
5 Jan 2011 #57
Depends highly on the arrogance with which you present yourself. Your's completely out of place Mädchen.

Do you seriously believe that throwing a couple of German names here and there will make you a German? lol I bet my German is better than yours and I'm not a German citizen like you (you say you are).

It was under Prussia rule after the partitions, that's true.

Let's be honest about it, what language do you believe was spoken in Danzig in its long history?
Sokrates 8 | 3,346
5 Jan 2011 #58
Let's be honest about it, what language do you believe was spoken in Danzig in its long history?

German, Polish, Yiddish, Latin, Dutch ...
guesswho 4 | 1,289
5 Jan 2011 #59
and the population was mainly ...% ??? and so what language was the mainly spoken language in Danzig?

Bring it on your "German". Can't wait. Hahahaha

one is for sure "Kacap", you'll be very disappointed about the level of your "German" (lol)

Anything smart to say or just wiki-quotes???

at least I'm backing up my knowledge with links about the historical facts and not just posting empty opinions like some of you. Anyone can spread a blabla bs and feel smart about it.
Marynka11 4 | 675
5 Jan 2011 #60
Let's be honest about it, what language do you believe was spoken in Danzig in its long history?

By that logic Texas and California are parts of Mexico :)


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