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What makes you feel Polish?


Novichok 1 | 2,780
1 Feb 2021 #31
They see speaking English as a step down,

What they don't know is how much that clinging costs them in actual dollars over a lifetime.
Spike31 2 | 2,224
1 Feb 2021 #32
Being a stubborn individualist makes me feel Polish.

And the fact that I have childhood friends that I visit only once every few years and we still connect instantly like we saw each other last time just yesterday.
Lyzko 30 | 7,388
1 Feb 2021 #33
They feel, and often rightly so I might add, that there' so much more to everyday life than current US-style vapid, infantile materialism. They sick and tired. I for one applaud them!
Paulina 10 | 1,860
2 Feb 2021 #34
I tried my best but there was always something (Unable to join the navy as an officer)

Dolno, were you unable to join the Navy at all or become an officer? Weren't you born in the UK?

in matriarchal matrix of madness feelings are everything and facts are hate speech? If I can be a woman tomorrow because I feel I am

As far as I remember you wrote that you don't regard yourself as a Pole, but an American, because you don't like Poland and Poles or whatever. So you "feel" American, despite being ethnically Polish. The first is a "feeling" and the other is a biological fact. Unless you're really Russian, of course ;)
Mr Grunwald 30 | 2,004
3 Feb 2021 #35
Pedantic as I am I'll start with writing that to me being Polish is a choice, I have always felt weird about my fellow Norwegians questioning my interest in Poland and things that are Polish. To me it was fully natural as my biological father is Polish and I associated every bit of upbringing I got from him with Poland. Wether it was movies we saw together (Polish movies/series), language patriotism lessons (Saturday's/Sunday's were dedicated to learning Polish grammar and how to say the months of the calendar in Polish), religion, my family's background and history. How it came to how it was my father got to Norway and why I was born in Norway. Who ruined our family's prospects and why, where Poland was&is located, history of Poland etc.

To me I allways linked Poland with loving her so, to me Poland was allways about love. Whenever I experienced bitterness, hatred, anger, loneliness I allways had patriotic music or something about Poland which reminded me of love.

Later on as I experienced life more and more I have come to appreciate it further, and even tho in my social background we are taught to hide our feelings, and only share it with God as most people seem to laugh at us for them. We are quite mysterious and misunderstood cause of that, many may think the worst of us. Simply cause we might seem so cold, while in reality we quite warm but, knowing of the consequences of sharing your feelings.

This is also why I love Poles so much, no matter what feeling one has, they share it with everyone. Wether it's negative or positive, terrible or awesome. A Poles emotions are sincere, and I want to grow closer to that, more then anything
delphiandomine 88 | 18,475
3 Feb 2021 #36
A Poles emotions are sincere

It's funny, but sincerity is not something I'd associate with Poles in general.
Mr Grunwald 30 | 2,004
3 Feb 2021 #37
@delphiandomine
You create the Pole you meet, if you give out emotions of a Pole being unable to have any virtues or good character. He/she will not try to improve his/her communication with you, simply by being obnoxious enough for you to want to leave them alone.

So it actually speaks more about you then about Poles in general, if that is your experience
delphiandomine 88 | 18,475
3 Feb 2021 #38
if you give out emotions of a Pole being unable to have any virtues or good character

They certainly have virtues and positive aspects of their character, but as soon as money's involved, forget about anything other than ruthlessness.

Even this can be positive, depending on the situation though. I quite like the fact that in Poland, no-one is going to bat an eyelid if you stick to the letter of your contract.
Paulina 10 | 1,860
3 Feb 2021 #39
@delph, really? Foreigners from the West often complained on PF how blunt Poles are, as far as I remember... I wouldn't say we're very open about our emotions here in Poland though... But maybe to someone who grew up in a Scandinavian country we seem like it :) ;)
Mr Grunwald 30 | 2,004
3 Feb 2021 #40
@Paulina
To be honest, any country is more open then a Scandinavian country. I however prefer Poland anyways, even tho I have been to several other countries. It's something about the food
delphiandomine 88 | 18,475
3 Feb 2021 #41
Foreigners from the West often complained on PF how blunt Poles are

In language, yes, but I notice that in other aspects, Poles are really similar to Brits in the way that they can't really give you a straight answer to money-related topics.

But I mean, this can also be to your advantage. I remember being asked to work overtime on a Sunday once, and after a simple "and it will be paid in next month's salary, right?", the topic was instantly dropped. Works for me ;)
jon357 67 | 16,921
3 Feb 2021 #42
Foreigners from the West often complained on PF how blunt Poles are

Presumably ones who've never met a Yorkshireman.

they can't really give you a straight answer to money-related topics.

A taboo, for good reason. With Poles though, you do need have everything absolutely clear first and ideally in front of witnesses and/or in writing.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,475
3 Feb 2021 #43
I actually like this way of doing things. It's much, much more straightforward - if someone tries to go back on their word, it's much easier to say 'Look, it's in writing', at which point, they tend to back down quickly. I also really like the way that illegal contract terms can simply be ignored.

IMO, it's a huge red flag in Poland if someone wants to work on the basis of an unwritten agreement.
Crow 148 | 9,321
3 Feb 2021 #44
When they in Poland molest you because you are Kashub, Lusatian, Silesian, Lemko, etc, you know you are Polish.
Lyzko 30 | 7,388
3 Feb 2021 #45
Once had an ESL-class of seven Poles between roughly twenty-five and fifty. This was several years ago, around the time Poland was getting unjustifiably bad press re: Poland's "role" in the Holocaust. They knew I spoke Polish and by coincedence, our class project was to describe in detail an aspect of their country they deemed most positive. One xwoung man angrily spoke up about hothe NYT was "writing s##t" concerning Jews and Poles. Then, the woman giving her talk about Tatry and the glories of Poland's natural wonderp, sudddnly started crying, only to be sebonded by yet another student applauding my desire to learn their language. Nearly each student took the slígts against Poland so personalky.
Ironside 50 | 11,056
4 Feb 2021 #46
to me being Polish is a choice

I know and I always liked that about you. Even if sometimes your take on thing is rather outlandish. I believe thought you can bring to the table some slightly different perspective and that is valuable.
Mr Grunwald 30 | 2,004
4 Feb 2021 #47
@Ironside
Thank you, I appreciate it
I love trying out new ideas and discuss them. One of the positive aspects of Norwegian schooling was learning reflection on several different topics, preferably opposing views. It's a stark contrast with the doctrine of "wkówanie" where you learn things, but not necessarily why.

With internet search engines the knowledge is easily available and forums an arena for exchange of ideas and thoughts. Sadly many people use such arena's for their own entertainment, struggles or political fights. I am guilty of it myself as I pretty much grew up on this forum.

I have always appreciated this place, Harry was an thorn in my backside annoying me information which I felt like a personal attack as he evidently didn't "side" with Poland, but criticized it. Meaning joining the "commies" camp of patronizing and putting down anything Polish, especially thing most Poles consider an achievement.

Thanks to it tho, I know now what to expect from anyone trying to defame Poland. So I am more mentally armed for such discussions.

That's another side of the coin of being Polish, the many opinions of a few Poles on the same topic! :)

Oh and Ironside, keep being the political compass you always have been. The one who is not afraid to check ones allegiances
Novichok 1 | 2,780
4 Feb 2021 #48
The Norwegians I've known all felt themselves Norwegian first and European second.

You are confusing Norway and Poland.
What I would like to know where does it say that just because a guy is born and raised in Poland, he is somehow obligated to like Poland and everything Polish.
Lyzko 30 | 7,388
4 Feb 2021 #49
How about the "polkosc" of a figure such as John Godson:-)
jon357 67 | 16,921
4 Feb 2021 #50
How about the "polkosc"

A good man, however he's obviously retained his own identity too. He's been here longer than some posters on here have been alive (as have I and a few others here).
Lyzko 30 | 7,388
4 Feb 2021 #51
So, so true.
Novichok 1 | 2,780
4 Feb 2021 #52
What the hell is "polskosc"? Did the Jews living in Poland for centuries acquire "polskosc" or did they still say "Poles and Jews"?
jon357 67 | 16,921
4 Feb 2021 #53
So, so true.

Exactly. What Polish (or British, Dutch, Chinese, American, Mexican etc) means to one person may differ from what it means to another.
Lyzko 30 | 7,388
4 Feb 2021 #54
Once again Novi, I'd have gladly invited you to have told Messrs. Brzechwa, Róziewicz, or Kiepura etc.that they had no polkosc LOL
Lenka 3 | 2,563
4 Feb 2021 #55
Lyzko, I beg of you, if you want to repeatedly use a word please check the spelling. It's ''polskość".

I have difficulty manipulating this tiny keyboard. Merely a typo, teacher!
Paulina 10 | 1,860
4 Feb 2021 #56
where does it say that just because a guy is born and raised in Poland, he is somehow obligated to like Poland and everything Polish.

And where does it say that just because a Jew/Jewess is born and raised in Poland, he/she is obligated to like Poland and everything Polish or identify himself/herself as Polish? You were born, raised and educated in Poland and yet you don't identify yourself as a Pole, despite being ethnically Polish and not experiencing any discrimination in Poland because of whom you were born.

Generally, Rich, I have an impression that just like Polish language, human beings and the world at large are a bit too complicated for you. Why don't you get interested in robots? They don't have "feelings" and such... lol
Lyzko 30 | 7,388
4 Feb 2021 #57
Assimilated Polish Jews felt themselves Polish by nationality, Jewish by religion.
Novichok 1 | 2,780
4 Feb 2021 #58
You were born, raised and educated in Poland and yet you don't identify yourself as a Pole

BS. It was the idiots here that made every possible effort to deny that I am Polish. Nothing, including my WUT diploma, birth certificate, passport, or even the book I translated with my name on it would convince them otherwise.

But I never played the role of an unassimilated Jew once I arrived here. I did my absolute best to be like the people who graciously allowed me to live with them and that is why I identify myself as an American - not out of fear or to make more money; the Jewish way. Right this minute, the only object I have that is Polish is my passport.

Generally, Rich, I have an impression that just like the Polish language, human beings ... are a bit too complicated for you.

It's actually very uncomplicated.

I have one life to live. It is, therefore, my desire and an option, to spend it in the best place possible - the United States of America. In 1966, Poland was not it and I was out.

The fact that I liked the American flag and language better was on the list further down but it was there.

Assimilated Polish Jews felt themselves Polish by nationality, Jewish by religion.

Interchangeably and when it would fit better.
Lyzko 30 | 7,388
4 Feb 2021 #59
No sense in denying who or what you are as there's always somebody out there ready, willing, and able to remind you.
jon357 67 | 16,921
4 Feb 2021 #60
Polish by nationality, Jewish by religion.

And of course the Frankist-era converts and their families didn't even follow the religion. Many, many, of today's Poles are descended from them.


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