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Last name - Murzyn


murzyn21
22 Dec 2007 #1
I am a 4th generation American and have always been told my last name Murzyn, literally translated means black person. Are there any Poles with this last name? Wondering what the history of my name is. Any help would be much appreciated.
Grzegorz_ 51 | 6,161
22 Dec 2007 #2
Murzyn, literally translated means black person.

Yes.

Are there any Poles with this last name?

Almost 2 thousand people.
haylee - | 2
29 Mar 2013 #3
Merged: What does the last name "Murzyn" mean?

I am 1/2 Polish. My parents and grandparents were all born in the U.S., so I don't know much about my heritage. Every now and then, I meet someone from Poland who tells me my last name, Murzyn, means "black person" or a derogatory (slang) term for black person. Can anyone shed light on why this word is my surname? I'm very curious about it's origins as a family name.
Gregoski - | 2
29 Mar 2013 #4
Black person is correct
polonius 54 | 420
29 Mar 2013 #5
MURZYN: originally from Latin Maurus (dark, black), which became Maur in German and Moor in English. Although it originally signified north Africans of mixed Berber and Arab blood, in Polish Murzyn has evolved to mean any representative of the Negroid race. Presumably in the old Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth anyone who stood out in his village for his unusually swarthy complexion might have been humorously dubbed 'Murzyn'.
Peter-KRK
29 Mar 2013 #6
It is still popular name in MaƂopolska area.
I suppouse that beginings of the name could be very simple. For instance. In XIV/XV c. we had a huge Vlach immigration. They settled all the mountains. In the same time German immigrants stared to build their cities in foothills. Contemporary Gorlice, Szymbark, Tymbark, Frysztak, Biecz and many others. Vlachs had tan skin and dark hair while Germans and Slavs could be brighter and they could call darker neighbours they used to meet "murzyn" (black man) or "czarny" (black) - the other popular name in southern Poland. It happens even today. This is absolutely not derogatory term in particular context. It could make your family history more interesting that you thought before.
Grzegorz_ 51 | 6,161
29 Mar 2013 #7
2604 Murzyn people in Poland.
moikrewni.pl/mapa/kompletny/murzyn.html
jon357 71 | 20,403
29 Mar 2013 #8
Murzyn, means "black person" or a derogatory (slang) term for black person. Can anyone shed light on why this word is my surname? I'm very curious about it's origins as a family name.

Same as the surname Moore, which has the same origin and is a related word.. Perhaps you have an ancestor from afar as Peter-KRK says. Or given that Poland was on two major trading routes, perhaps even from further away.
stoimislaw - | 5
29 Mar 2013 #9
I am 1/2 Polish. My parents and grandparents were all born in the U.S., so I don't know much about my heritage. Every now and then, I meet someone from Poland who tells me my last name, Murzyn, means "black person" or a derogatory (slang) term for black person. Can anyone shed light on why this word is my surname? I'm very curious about it's origins as a family name.

The word "murzyn" denotes black person, correct, but it is not a derogatory terms by any means in Polish or when used in Poland. It is used mainly to point out a black person of, as someone here already explained, Negroid type. It is a more specific term than another commonly used phrase - "czarny" - which simply means black colour. Derogatory term would "czarnuch". From what I noticed "murzyn" is used almost as often in Poland as the term "black" in Western countries applied in the same contexts, only it is more specific a term.
haylee - | 2
30 Mar 2013 #10
Thank you all for your replies, they were all very helpful :)
lflunt
8 Nov 2014 #11
My Mother is from Poland and her Mothers maiden is Murzyn too until she married her husband then it changed to Wegnyn.
Wulkan - | 3,243
8 Nov 2014 #12
What does the last name "Murzyn" mean?

It means a black man
jon357 71 | 20,403
8 Nov 2014 #13
Think of the English surname Moore.
Murzyn#1
28 May 2017 #14
My grandmother was from Warsaw, my grandfather's parents were from Poland (don't where) on my paternal side. I am 2nd/3rd generation. My last name is Murzyn. Grew up & living in Pittsburgh PA. So I am familiar with the so called meaning. Didn't think it was a very common name until I had my wallet stolen.
pawian 190 | 19,211
6 Oct 2020 #15
We had a male cat in 1970s, all black, and his name was Murzyn.
dolnoslask 6 | 3,070
6 Oct 2020 #16
Amazing you have dug up a thread that talks about white Polish people with the surname Murzyn as J357 says Moor.

Strange how today the foreign PC brigade that are guests here in Poland are using this word to accuse poles of racism.
jon357 71 | 20,403
6 Oct 2020 #17
guests here

The government would disagree with you.

What isn't at issue is the origin of the name; it has a clear cognate on the British Isles (and other countries to) which presumably reflects (if perhaps inaccurately) someones origins.

foreign

Everyone is to some degree, since Homo Sapiens didn't arise here in Poland; we can all trace our DNA back to Africa originally.
Mr Grunwald 33 | 2,019
7 Oct 2020 #18
@jon357
Are you telling us that every human being can claim land in Africa? Hmm
jon357 71 | 20,403
7 Oct 2020 #19
claim land

You think very distant descent means someone can "claim land"?

Stick to the topic please
pawian 190 | 19,211
7 Oct 2020 #20
Amazing you have dug up a thread that talks about white Polish people with the surname Murzyn as J357 says Moor.

Which is amazing exactly????
That:

I dug sth up
it was a thread
it talked
it was about whites
it was about Poles
it was about people
it was about people called Murzyn
jon said sth
he said Moor.

yes, guys, stick to the topic, please and comment on my cat`s name - Murzyn. Was it inappropriate in 1970s?

Now I am arranging a new cat for us - a student of mine has 3 to offer - one is black and I am going to see it tomorrow.
jon357 71 | 20,403
7 Oct 2020 #21
Stick to the topic please

Interesting that the mod criticised me rather than the person who tried to go off-topic. Not for the first time either...

Anyway, it's very on-topic to discuss how the surname Murzyn originated and the historical background of the name Murzyn. Its cognates in nearby countries suggest a similar pattern of migration. There are equivalent surnames in various countries in Europe; They all suggest migration from far away, and darker-skinned forebears. The surname Turek isn't rare in Poland either.

Even though there's a limit to what people can say about the surname in question without more historical specifics.

Murzyn. Was it inappropriate in 1970s?

It doubtless was a well-intentioned name. Black cats are the best; what will you call the new one?
Mr Grunwald 33 | 2,019
8 Oct 2020 #22
@jon357
I will send you a message to your inbox regarding post #19

The problem here is that, I came with the predisposition that it didn't have racial origin, but rather religious/cultural and was being misused by racists or anyone having a negative attitude towards someone they judge very... "cover of the book only". If you consider somebody an enemy, that enemy can quickly conclude that you are automatically his enemy then, without even thinking of it at first, merely by judging ones behavior and ignoring the possibility of a misunderstood event or events in the past.

For instance, I remember far more easily picture/faces/places I have seen then names/letters as the former stir up emotions in me.

Most Poles opinion of people who have not been in contact with the Polish state throughout history, or at least not well known enough (like history of Haiti for instance) can easily misjudge basing it on news-coverage alone.

Even tho most Poles consider Nazism/Fascism and communism an enemy ideology to Poland, few Poles can point out what the ideology is based on. But more about what's it's followers have done.

Therefore as a Polish goal to fight what plagued Germany right before and during ww2. Which started a huge calamity for all humankind (one only needs to think about how it affected the continents in the world with the power shift)

One cannot, and should not use Darwinian terms or even line of thinking. Humans were made, came from monkeys. Are animals no more tho

Sorting ourselves in the manner of animals, did prove to be a disaster. Not to mention the continued tension which plagued for a long time in the United States of America
jon357 71 | 20,403
8 Oct 2020 #23
I will send you a message

Thanks; replied.

but rather religious/cultura

With surnames, so many in Poland are descriptions; how a family were perceived by neighbours on the basis of appearance. Murzyn and Turek are good examples of this. It also shows how people moved around centuries ago, and also reflect Poland's position on majot north/south trade routes - the Amber Route among them.
pawian 190 | 19,211
10 Oct 2020 #24
Murzyn and Turek are good examples of this

Murzyn surname was first used in Poland in 1592.
genezanazwisk.pl/content/murzyn
Joker 2 | 2,442
11 Oct 2020 #25
Are there any Poles with this last name?

Do you need some Insurance? Stop by and visit Jay Murzyn.....

statefarm.com/agent/us/in/whiting/jay-murzyn-4lbp21ys000?cmpid=byxo_blm_0005



pawian 190 | 19,211
1 Aug 2022 #26
Stan Murzyn has left us and this pathetic world:



pawian 190 | 19,211
1 Aug 2022 #27
Amazing you have dug up a thread

Wow! Amasing you used the word which has become cult today.

The surname Turek isn't rare in Poland either.

Yes, I remember a student with that surname 20 years ago (Turek means Turk). He drew beautiful pics but was a bit lazy so some teachers didn`t like him. I still see in my mind`s eyes how a female teacher entered our classroom and screamed: Turek! Where is your home assignment??!! :):):)
pawian 190 | 19,211
4 Aug 2022 #28
More Murzyn surnames





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