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Does your last name end in CKI not SKI



chuckb561    
30 Jun 2014  #31

So Berestetsky could mean someone from the village of Berest?


Guest    
2 Jul 2014  #32

Generally -ski could be unterstand as "from something" or "related to sth". As a example niebo=sky and color niebieski is a color of sky (blue). And the same is with names it could be Zamojski is a person from Zamość, but my surname is Kmiecikowski (kmiec=peasant) my ancestors were in some way connected with peasants (I do not know if one was nobilited or he had many). And at the begining -ski was only a surname of nobility.

--
Krzysztof Kmiecikowski
Polonius3 1,008 | 12,443    
2 Jul 2014  #33

**But there is a surname like Dziedzicki. As a patronymic nick it would mean "son of the lord/squire/". In some cases it may have emerged as a toponmyic tag to identify a native of the village of Dziedzice.

**Rather from the locality of Beresteczko in what is now Ukranian-occuped eastern Poland. In the mid-17th century the flower of Polish knighthood delivered a stunning defeat there to the rebelling Cossack hordes.
chuckb561    
3 Jul 2014  #34

Thank you Polonius3! Looks like another place for me to research. ;-)
SzenkUK88 1 | 19    
4 Jul 2014  #35

I like having the name Szenk, I think it's quite unique (as in the Polish version of the name). People in England can't pronounce it for love nor money. Germans manage to tell what it is quite quickly though.
Polonius3 1,008 | 12,443    
4 Jul 2014  #36

Shenk doesn't seem that dffiicult for Anglos to pronounce. Once they know the sz has an sh sound. Now if it were Chrzęszczykiewicz, that would be quite another story!

KMIECIKOWSKI: Kmiecikowski may have emerged as a tri-generational surname. The father was known as Kmieć (the peasant); His son was Kmiecik (the peasant's son) and his son in turn was called Kmiecikowski.

No coat of arms goes with Kmiecikowski but there is one for an etymologically related one -- Kmieciński. The well-born Kmiecińskis were entitled to use the Hozjusz heraldic device.

SZENK: Shenk doesn't seem that dffiicult for Anglos to pronounce. Once they know the sz has an sh sound. Now if it were Chrzęszczykiewicz, that would be quite another story!
SzenkUK88 1 | 19    
7 Jul 2014  #37

You'd be surprised that they just don't make the connection.

The names I usually get called are; s-zenk, sa-zenk, zenk, s-zank, zank, s-cze-znik (that last one is my favourite)
Wulkan - | 3,061    
7 Jul 2014  #38

The names I usually get called are; s-zenk, sa-zenk, zenk, s-zank, zank, s-cze-znik (that last one is my favourite)

Because they don't realise that sz = sh, that's it :-)
SzenkUK88 1 | 19    
7 Jul 2014  #39

I know that they struggle with that but it get's ridiculous. For example if I give someone my name over the phone, 9 times out of 10 they will still repeat it back to me in a completely different way to how I said it to them.
Heather Winnick    
24 Aug 2014  #40

Hi. Wondering if anyone knows about the name Winnicki. I am doing my family tree and am having issue with my fathers family. Winnicki is my grandfathers name ( they came in the 1890's and his passport is from Galicia)... My grandmother's family came in the 1890's as well and they were Prystach. Ellis island records do not match the limited papers I found upon my grandmothers passing... Any hints tips or anecdotal info is much appreciated.
Polonius3 1,008 | 12,443    
25 Aug 2014  #41

WINNiCKI: root-word winnica (vineyard); either occupational nick for vineyard owner or topo nick from a locality called Winnica.

PRYSTACH: Ruthenian version of Przystarz (a husband who has settled on a wife's family farm).
Tamara 9 | 201    
25 Aug 2014  #42

Biedrzycki (a)

Does this have to do with ladybugs?
pam    
25 Aug 2014  #43

I don't think so. Ladybugs are Biedronki in Polish.
The poster Polonius3 often gives meanings of surnames, so perhaps he will be able to help.
Polonius3 1,008 | 12,443    
25 Aug 2014  #44

BIEDRZYCKI: like most surnames ending in -ski, -cki and -dzki, this is probably a topo nick from Biedrzyce.
A biedronka (ladybug) is called that in Polish because it was thought to resemble a miniature version of a red-coated cow. A biedroń is a red bull and a biedrula a red cow. A ladybug is also known by such folk terms as boża krówka (God's little cow) and krówka Matki Boskiej (Our Lady's little cow).
Heather Winnick    
26 Aug 2014  #45

Polonius your are awesome. Any chance you are into Thelonius Monk?
Found two people with the info you provided. One named Bobeck or Bobick and the other Wojowciewski? Any chance your genius could help me here!!!

Thank you so much!!!
I am eager to find family as we know only our immediate members and from I can tell a lot of people came over at that time. Why they mass exodused is still stumping me? As is the Russian approved passport of my grandfather - I trying to find an old Russian translator !!!
Tamara 9 | 201    
26 Aug 2014  #46

so I was close.....a little. :)
Polonius3 1,008 | 12,443    
26 Aug 2014  #47

Wojowciewski

Wojowciewski does not exist in Poland. It is possible linguistically, but if it ever existed it was surely on the rare side.
Wojciewski would be more like it. It comes from the first name Wojciech but most likely originated as a topo nick from places such as Wojcieszyce, Wojciechy, Wojcieszyn or similar.

For 123 years between the late 18th century and 1918 Poland did not exist as an indepndent country, having been carved up by Russia, Prussia and Austria. Tsarist Russia had annexed the largest chunk of Polish territory. Poles coming to America in that period bore passports of that parttioning power which ruled their native region.

For translation of Russian documents check out: andywbuffalo@yahoo.com
Heather Winnick    
27 Aug 2014  #48

Thank you!! I am getting a better picture now!!!

Thank you so much :-)
Mazovia    
28 Aug 2014  #49

A biedroń is a red bull and a biedrula a red cow.

Hark, P3, you are the man, dude, I didn't know that. keep a good job
SonOfUlanow    
24 Nov 2014  #50

Hi everyone,

I'm new to this forum, and have a few questions about my family surnames. My paternal grandmother's family are from southeastern Poland, near Ulanow/Przedzel/Rudnick/Zarzecze. My research shows that there still families in that area with each of these surnames.

Wrobel - I read that this surname is used by both Polish and Jewish people. Did one group borrow it from the other?
Puskarczyk - what does this name mean? Is the -czyk suffix typical of Polish surnames?
Rzepiela - this name does not sound Polish to me; what is its origin?
Dubeil - also does not sound Polish to me; what is its origin?

Thank you!

sorry, I forgot to say that I am writing from the USA -
aunti B    
14 Nov 2016  #51

hi I married into bialota family and my sister into bialecki, we have been told ,but not sure bialota means piece of white cloth like you put on back of chair , what might bialeki mean and is meaning right for bialota
NoToForeigners 6 | 689    
14 Nov 2016  #52

my last name is zbucki :] in polish, c is pronounced as an 's'

Bzdura. Nonsense
Lyzko 15 | 2,915    
14 Nov 2016  #53

'C' is pronounced as "TS", not "S"!
Wulkan - | 3,061    
15 Nov 2016  #54

You need to say that "TS" very quickly if you want the final sound to be correct when doing it that way.
Lyzko 15 | 2,915    
15 Nov 2016  #55

Right.



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