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Knew I was Hungarian, but my DNA came back Polish?


Bob D
19 May 2009 #1
Hello all,
Like many Americans, my ancestry is pretty varied, or at least where my ancestors came from. I also was aware that my Great Grandfather (Mothers side) came from Hungary.

So late last year I had an autosomal DNA test done. Of the top 20 region matches, 15 of them were in Poland!? I asked about any Polish history in our family, and no one seems to know of any.

I'm reading that there are similarities and a closeness between the two groups, but could anyone give some historical perspective that may clear this up for me? (and no, as much as my parents may have liked to have thought when I was a child, no adoption or infidelity lol!)

Thanks in advance,
Bob
Wroclaw 44 | 5,384
19 May 2009 #2
you need to read this:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Austro-Hungarian_Empire
McCoy 27 | 1,269
19 May 2009 #3
Of the top 20 region matches, 15 of them were in Poland!?

congratulations. its like winning the lottery
Torq
19 May 2009 #4
Sorbs, Poles and Hungarians have biggest amount of gene R1a1(56-60%)
in Europe. It's very probable that we come from the same ancestors.

Check out more detailed info here:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R1a1

That's quite amazing, isn't it?
jwojcie 2 | 763
20 May 2009 #5
Hm... Stefan Batory, elected as King of Poland in 1576 was Hungarian... Actually, Anna Jagielonka was elected, and then nobles married her with Stefan... So maybe you have some royal blood in you ;-)

Stefan was good King... you should be proud ;-)
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
22 May 2009 #6
Could you please share a few comments on the DNA check? How is it done, what does it cost, etc.?
Bobd
22 May 2009 #7
I used a company called "DNA tribes". They use autosomal testing.

I thought this site did a nice job of comparing the various DNA companies and methods...
isogg.org/eochart.htm

There is, as to be expected, some controversy about the types of test, and companies interpretations. I felt the DNA tribes method was, in my opinion, a good one...
Guest
26 May 2009 #8
Stefan Batory

isnt batory when some one beats you up? i would really hate that last name that & slain people might be afriad of you
Salomon 2 | 436
26 May 2009 #9
It's very probable that we come from the same ancestors.

Like Budda :

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R1a1

Several Indian studies have pressed the case for an Indian origin for R1a1 from the diversity and distinctiveness of microsatellite Y-STR variation. Sengupta et al. conclude that there must have been an independent R1a1 population in India dating back to a much earlier expansion than the Indo-Aryan migration.

Sister Sledge - We are family
jwojcie 2 | 763
27 May 2009 #10
isnt Batory when some one beats you up? i would really hate that last name that & slain people might be afraid of you

He he, I didn't think of that :-) But it would rather be like that:
- baty = whipping
- baciory = big whipping (not batory) :-)

Beside polish version Batory is polonized hungarian surname Báthory... So you should ask some Hungarian what is the meaning (if any) of Báthory
Salomon 2 | 436
27 May 2009 #11
Multiple Origins of Ashkenazi Levites: Y Chromosome Evidence for Both
Near Eastern and European Ancestries

familytreedna.com/pdf/Levite%20paper.pdf

If a European origin for the Ashkenazi Levite haplogroup
R1a1 component is accepted as a reasonable
possibility
, it is of interest to speculate further on the
possible timing, location, and mechanism of this event.
Because the modal haplotype of haplogroup R1a1
found in the Ashkenazi Levites is found at reasonably
high frequency throughout the eastern European region

LOL ]:-)

ac

Blessing gesture depicted on the gravestone of Rabbi and Kohen Meschullam Kohn

/wiki/Priestly_Blessing

The Priestly Blessing, (Hebrew: ברכת כהנים‎; translit. Birkat Kohanim), also known in Hebrew as Nesiat Kapayim, (lit. Raising of the Hands), is a Jewish prayer recited by Kohanim during certain Jewish services. It is based on a scriptural verse: "They shall place My name upon the children of Israel, and I Myself shall bless them."[1] It consists of the following Biblical verses (Numbers 6:24-26):
May YHWH bless you and guard you - יְבָרֶכְךָ יְהוָה, וְיִשְׁמְרֶךָ
May YHWH make His face shine on you and show favor to you - יָאֵר יְהוָה פָּנָיו אֵלֶיךָ, וִיחֻנֶּךָּ

/wiki/Ten_Lost_Tribes

The phrase Ten Lost Tribes of Israel refers to the ancient Tribes of Israel that disappeared from the Biblical account after the Kingdom of Israel was destroyed, enslaved and exiled by ancient Assyria.[1] Many groups of Jews have doctrines concerning the continued hidden existence or future public return of these tribes. This is a subject that is partially based upon authenticated and documented historical fact, partially upon written religious tradition and partially upon speculation. There is a vast amount of literature on the Lost Tribes and no specific source can be relied upon for a complete answer.

catholicvoice
HatefulBunch397 - | 658
27 May 2009 #12
What's going on here? R1a1 is common in Eastern Europe. There's no need to panic. It means people are more mixed than they realize ;) But everyone is still a caucasion anyway.
Shyn
24 May 2010 #13
Beside polish version Batory is polonized hungarian surname Báthory... So you should ask some Hungarian what is the meaning (if any) of Báthory

I'm Hungarian and our word "bátor" means "brave" :3 Báthory is just a bit of playing around with that word (there are several different versions to write it from Báthory to Bátori), but the core would be "bátor". Yeah, quite a difference in meaning XD
shewolf 5 | 1,077
24 May 2010 #14
So late last year I had an autosomal DNA test done. Of the top 20 region matches, 15 of them were in Poland!? I asked about any Polish history in our family, and no one seems to know of any.

Bob, did they give you three matches: Native, Global, and World Populations? Did you get Polish in all matches? Were they your top matches?

I took the test some time ago and got matched with the exact city where my dad was born. So there's definitely accuracy involved.
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
25 May 2010 #15
I don't know much about DNA ethnicity tests, but from a hysterical and cultural point of view Poles and Hungarians have been traditional friends over the ages. Polak, Węgier dwa bratanki,i do szabli i do szklanki (Poles and Hungarians fight and drink side by side) goes a well-known saying.

The Carpathian Mts did not prevent a fair amount of interaction between Poland and Hungary – merchants, itinerant beggars, pilgrims travelling to religious shrines and assorted travellers, even wounded soldiers nursed back to health who decided to settle – all played a part in the two nations' interaction. When Bathory Istvan (Stefan Batory), the Prince of Transylvania) became king of Poland, he brought with him his courtiers, customs, etc. During WW2 secret couriers regularly travelled between Poland and Hungary with messages for Polish forces in the West... Invariably, families arose and children were born out of such inter-ethnic liaisons over the generations...

Hope this helps a bit.
Leka
8 Jan 2011 #16
Similarity between Hungarians on one side and Slavic Poles and Slovaks on the other side is a result of very strong hungarization during Middle Ages, especially during 19th century. Today, in northern serbian province - Vojvodina, lives many Hungarians with polish, rutheninan (rusin not russian!) and slovakian las rnames. Therefore, connectivity is not from a common ancestor, but from the political power.
hagyjalmar
30 Nov 2011 #17
I am Hungarian too, the family name has nothing to do with the word "bátor". Báthory means literally "from Báthor" which is a shortened and older spelling of the name of the town Nyírbátor.
Sara A R 1 | 9
30 Nov 2011 #18
I had an autosomal DNA test done

How much did that cost and where can I go to get it done o:
mrozenbe - | 12
1 Dec 2011 #19
Stefan Batory in Polish edition sounds like Jerzy Waszynkton.

Batory is from Hungarian bátor.
noreenb 7 | 557
1 Dec 2011 #20
George Washington.
(For that matter, mrozenbe).
Peter Cracow
1 Dec 2011 #21
could anyone give some historical perspective that may clear this up for me

It means nothing.
Hungarians had over 1000 years to blend their genes with their Slavish neighbours.
pawian 197 | 19,922
1 Dec 2011 #22
but could anyone give some historical perspective that may clear this up for me?

Check this video:
youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=EQd-eg4FyKo
archiwum 13 | 125
20 Jul 2012 #23
Haplogroup is not a procise science.


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