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Andruszkiewicz, Judycki surnames


Nickidewbear 23 | 569
31 Jan 2014  #1
Discussion moved from: https://polishforums.com/genealogy/relatives-pictures-look-69743/

They could easly pass as Polish.

And that they did. Regina's mom was an Andruskiewicz, z"l. (The Andrulewiczes used "Andruskiewicz" as well as other names and variants.) and her dad was a Judicki (Yuditski. His surname was a matronymic meaning "ben-Yudit"). The other one was Great-Granddad's uncle Ignacy, z"l.
OP Paulina 9 | 1,448
31 Jan 2014  #2
Franciszka Andruszkiewiczowna Judicka and Antonio Judicki

Originally it must have been "Judycka" and "Judycki". Here you have an example of a person with such surname:
pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agnieszka_Judycka

As for "Adruszkiewicz"... That's interesting. Does your family has noble roots perhaps?
pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andruszkiewicz_%28herb_szlachecki%29

And somebody who looks as Polish as [insert the most Polish thing you can think of here] but uses a non-Polish first name and a non-Polish surname very possibly doesn't consider themself to be Polish.

Harry, what on Earth are you talking about? Ask an American to read/pronounce the name "Franciszka" lol No wonder she changed it to "Frances" (English equivalent of her name).
Nickidewbear 23 | 569
31 Jan 2014  #3
Originally it must have been "Judycka" and "Judycki".

It was. I misspelled.

As for "Adruszkiewicz"... That's interesting. Does your family has noble roots perhaps?

No. For whatever reason, the Andrulevièus name became played with and got turned into variants like:

- Andrulewicz
- Andrelovich
- Andrelewitz
- Androlowicz
- Andrulev ich
- Andralowitz
- Andrew
- Andrews

"Andruskiewicz" happened to be among those variants. I have no idea why. It was part of the passing game, I suppose.

Harry:Which names did they actually use? In this part of the world at that time the name which somebody used said a lot about who they considered themselves to be. Given the extent of inter-mingling of the various groups, often one's 'nationality' could be self-declared. And somebody who looks as Polish as [insert the most Polish thing you can think of here] but uses a non-Polish first name and a non-Polish surname very possibly doesn't consider themself to be Polish.
Harry, what on Earth are you talking about? Ask an American to read/pronounce the name "Franciszka" lol No wonder she changed it to "Frances" (English equivalent of her name).

The Andrulevièuses (as someone told me here) took their name in Stakliškės. Also, as I showed with the letter, Bołeslaw Andrulewicz made no bones about not being Polish, German, or Russian. If Frances did consider herself Jewish and was more open about it than I would have thought, I'm surprised (I guess that I shouldn't have been given how Orthodox the Andrulevièuses were prior to becoming Anusim-though some did not. After all, her aunt married a Jewish lantsman named Julian Czernecki and called her favorite sons-John Felix and Joseph Paschal-"Jankie" (for Felix) and "Susi" (both of which are Yiddish or Hebrew nicknames).).
OP Paulina 9 | 1,448
31 Jan 2014  #4
No. For whatever reason, the Andrulevièus name became played with and got turned into variants like:

Are you sure? Because it looks like her husband could have noble ancestry too:
pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judycki
Nickidewbear 23 | 569
31 Jan 2014  #5
I doubt it. He was born in Polkowo to a Jacob whose dad was a Josef. He was very much a ben-Yudyt (בן-יודית). His mother was a Maryanna Imsencka. His wife (my cousin of blessed memory) was born in Wielanowo, as was her mother (Antonina Seczeniewska). The Andrulevièuses could be found in Bose and Orlinek, but they had no aversion to travel. Great-Granddad, e.g., was born in Tsuman (then Cumań) when his mother was en route to or from visiting Vil'gel'm Andrulevich of Buzhanka (now in Cherkas'ka Oblast). His cousin Nik was in Vilna, and some Andrulevièuses escaped to Hungary as Anusim in the 1700s (which surprised me).
lunacy - | 73
31 Jan 2014  #6
I doubt it.

It might be true though! Szlachta was very diverse as it comes to their origins - people tend to foget that Polish-Lithuanian commonwealth was full of different nationalities, all were equally likely to gain the title for their deeds or wartime merits, Polish was "only" the official language. BTW szlachta was quite often poor [szlachta zaściankowa, szlachta czynszowa], and they didn't resemble the western "nobles" so the concept of szlachta shouldn't be compared to it, just reminding the facts.

I found an official list of szlachta that lived in Vilinius region here: genealogia.lt/szlachta_wilenska.pdf [in Polish but it's a list only - there are both Andruszkiewicz and Judycki surnames]
OP Paulina 9 | 1,448
31 Jan 2014  #7
I doubt it.

Um... OK... But... Well, you see, if one of the spouses is of possible noble ancestry then it can be some surname coincidence, maybe, I guess, I don't know... But if the other spouse is of possible noble ancestry too... Then most probably it's no coincidence, because nobles did marry among each other in the past. I don't know what ben-Yudyt means but names Józef and Jakub were and are used by Poles too.

Also, the fact that Franciszka retained her maiden name could mean she was of noble ancestry. Of course, it's just my guess, but it all fits pretty well.

I found an official list of szlachta that lived in Vilinius region here: ... [in Polish but it's a list only - there are both Andruszkiewicz and Judycki surnames]

I've also found "Andruszkiewicz" among Polish nobles from Wołyń:

hen conspiracy of Emperors made the weakening Republic was sentenced to non-existence, its eastern - Lithuanian and Russian - lands were in the next partitions attached to the Russian Empire, in the the Volyn, who in 1795 became one of the province consisting of 12 districts - the central city of Zhitomir. Volyn nobility found itself facing a new legal and administrative situation, so different from the Polish law and tradition.

Initially, after the division of the lands attached to the governorates and the introduction of the Russian government, maintained the old land courts and Polish officials lower administration and tried to get the favor of the Polish nobility, and through her nobility having estates - posesjonatów. In contrast, treated suspiciously minor gentry, most strongly patriotic [3]. In areas connected, the Polish element was liczebniejszy from invaders and not very readable - the same dangerous - in its ownership. That is why, among other things, it was decided to verify the Polish nobility by ordering her "Hramoty of nobility" to identify themselves before Herold in the St. Petersburg. As rightly foresees a large part of the nobility fine made considerable trouble to present the relevant documents which may indicate nobility.

Nickidewbear 23 | 569
31 Jan 2014  #8
Pop-Pop would've noted that were that true, though. He tried to connect the Czerneckis (Chernetskis) to Stefan Czarniecki and mentioned no other families. Then he changed his story to "If we had any Jewish blood, I don't know about it." Also, Great-Great-Grandma retained "Andrulewicz" and "Andrulevich". Also, that side of the family doesn't trace the Judyckis beyond 1815 (Josef's birth year, and he was in Białystok), and they couldn't figure out who Franz's dad was until I was able to note the connection (as I recall. Franz was Franciszka's dad and Great-Great-Grandma's brother.).

Great-Great-Grandma's favorite sons were even "Jankie" and "Susi" (two sons who they could give Jewish nicknames), and she was furious when Great-Granddad married a believing Jew (my Great-Grandma Czarnecki, nee Trudnak; the daughter of a Nagy-Trudynak and a Korsch-Munka). She was also furious that he married for love (as shiddukh was the norm even among Anusim who cared about halakhah at all).
Rosie JB
30 Apr 2018  #9
first time posting, but I noticed Nickidewbear mentioning Judycki from Bialystok. My grandfather was a Judycki from Bialystok. This first name was Konstanty, I think. He never talked english but I remember people calling him Connie or Gus. I think this middle name was Gustav. I wish I knew more about his family. He moved to the USA after he was married with one child, first living in Nebraska before finally settling in Chicago til he died.
Nickidewbear 23 | 569
21 May 2018  #10
Merged:

Can Someone Help Me Find Out What Happened To A Relative?



Can anyone find out for me what happened to a Rochla Andrelewitz, whom was my great-great-grandmother Alexandria's cousin and seems to have disappeared in or after 1907? She immigrated to Brooklyn from Wilno in 1907. Her name was Rochla bas Gilya or Rochla bat Gilya, possibly Rachel bat Hillel once she cam e here.
kaprys 2 | 1,802
21 May 2018  #11
Didn't she change her name?
Rochla would be Rachel, wouldn't it?
Andrelewitz looks like a misspelling, too?
Nickidewbear 23 | 569
22 May 2018  #12
Andrelewitz is one of the variants of "Andrulevicus" or "Andrulevicius" that we used. At some point (I don't know when), we either Ashkenazized our name or took an Ashkenazi name. On her record[/url], the stem of the "d" is faded:

libertyellisfoundation.org/passenger-details/czoxMjoiMTAzMjk1MTMwMTQzIjs=/czo5OiJwYXNzZW5nZXIiOw==
kaprys 2 | 1,802
22 May 2018  #13
I think the main problem is that we don't know what name she might have used.
I'm sorry I can't help.
Nickidewbear 23 | 569
22 May 2018  #14
She may have used "Regina" or "Rose" if not "Rachel".
kaprys 2 | 1,802
23 May 2018  #15
Was there a Jewish Council or a synagogue in Brooklyn back then?
Could they have any information about her?
Nickidewbear 23 | 569
23 May 2018  #16
There are quite a few synagogues in Brooklyn. Also, I could use her aunt's name (Mrs. Sarah?. Here, they mistyped her name is "Anarelewitz").

I can't read her aunt's surname, though.
kaprys 2 | 1,802
23 May 2018  #17
I'm not registered on ancestry.com so I can't see it.
I don't really know much about immigration documents but since Rochla is yiddish, she may have been religious and might have attended the synagogue. Perhaps they have some further information about her.
Nickidewbear 23 | 569
23 May 2018  #18
She was definitely frum. PS The record is attached.


  • Very cropped, reflects only her record
Nickidewbear 23 | 569
25 May 2018  #19
@kaprys, it turns out that her aunt's surname was "HaLevi". I can't figure out the aunt's middle name, though, and I still can't find information on her.
kaprys 2 | 1,802
25 May 2018  #20
I'm sorry but all I can help you with is that in Polish the aunt's name would probably have been Sara ha-Lewi.


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