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The most typical ingredient used in Polish cuisine


Romi Shahi 1 | -
28 Jan 2011  #1
The most typical ingredients used in Polish cuisine are sauerkraut, beetroot, cucumbers (gherkins), sour cream, kohlrabi, mushrooms, sausages and smoked sausage. A meal owes it taste to the herbs and spices used; such as marjoram, dill, caraway seeds, parsley, or pepper. The most popular desserts are cakes and pastries. A shot of vodka is an appropriate addition to festive meals and help you to digest the food.

Magdalena 3 | 1,837
28 Jan 2011  #2
sauerkraut, beetroot, cucumbers (gherkins), sour cream, kohlrabi, mushrooms, sausages and smoked sausage.

Do you really believe that or are you winding us up?
Lodz_The_Boat 32 | 1,535
28 Jan 2011  #3
Go to his profile. He is a Nepalese trying to show some respect and admiration. Maybe he got the same in Poland as he came? :) ... maybe love too :D ...

Romi Shahi

Whatever you say correct or not well researched ... in whichever way! ... I THANK YOU!... welcome to Poland.
Ksysia 25 | 430
28 Jan 2011  #4
Welcome to Poland, good to have you!
alexw68
28 Jan 2011  #5
Seconded. Namaste, Romi-dhai!
Magdalena 3 | 1,837
28 Jan 2011  #6
Go to his profile. He is a Nepalese trying to show some respect and admiration.

I have nothing against Romi. I just have an allergic reaction to stereotypes, whether positive or negative. And the Polish food = gherkins, sausages and mushrooms stereotype just totally gets my goat ;-)
Teffle 22 | 1,321
28 Jan 2011  #7
And the Polish food = gherkins, sausages and mushrooms stereotype

C'mon - it's not exactly wildly off the mark though is it?

I'm pretty sure every single Polish meal I have had featured the above : )
Magdalena 3 | 1,837
28 Jan 2011  #8
WOW.
And to think I've lived in Poland most of my life... I would say everyday Polish cuisine is very "cosmopolitan" in the sense of "not typically Polish" - stuff like roast chicken, potatoes and salad, or meatballs and spaghetti, or fried fish and potatoes and salad, or pizza (I mean home-made), or the famous kotlety schabowe... Usually it's some form of fried or roast meat, potatoes, and salad. And soup. I don't know many women who toil in their kitchens every day to produce pierogi, bigos, gołąbki or other types of old-timesy, basically peasant food.

It's only when we have guests from abroad, or live abroad ourselves, that we start overloading on the "traditional" ingredients such as mushrooms or gherkins. And during Christmas and Easter, of course ;-)
convex 20 | 3,978
28 Jan 2011  #9
Comeon, it's taters, meat, and pickles...
Magdalena 3 | 1,837
28 Jan 2011  #10
Sometimes it is, sometimes it isn't... I use pickles when imagination fails me as to what kind of salad to make.
convex 20 | 3,978
28 Jan 2011  #11
see, have to tease the pickles out...but they're always there :)

The granddaddy of all Polish meals:

1 slice of bread
1 knife load of butter
1 piece of ham

combined in whatever way the hungry person would like to attack it.
Magdalena 3 | 1,837
28 Jan 2011  #12
but they're always there :)

No they aren't! ;-p

Stop spreading false rumours this instant! ;-)
Wroclaw Boy
28 Jan 2011  #13
1 slice of bread
1 knife load of LURPAK butter
1 piece of ham

and what a cracking meal that is.

Funnily enough ive just eaten Schabowy, mash potato, gherkins and Buraczki with sos pieczeniowy.
Marcus911 3 | 102
28 Jan 2011  #14
Nothing wrong with Polish food, Great selection of soups, salads etc although I tend to add my own ingredients into some of the more traditional meals, Golobki, Pierogi, to liven them up a little, as these can be a little bland for me however i'm into spicy garlicy food.

Kielbasa and Kaszanka are great for barbecuing, along with the great variety of Polish beers and hot summers, your on a winner every time.
enkidu 7 | 623
29 Jan 2011  #15
Cabbage. With cabbage sauce. With this rotten-cabbage (Sauerkraut) salad as a side dish.
And of course a nice cup of the cabbage tea.
That's the "most typical ingredients".
z_darius 14 | 3,969
29 Jan 2011  #16
The most typical ingredients used in Polish cuisine are sauerkraut, beetroot, cucumbers (gherkins), sour cream, kohlrabi, mushrooms, sausages and smoked sausage. A meal owes it taste to the herbs and spices used; such as marjoram, dill, caraway seeds, parsley, or pepper.

Yeah, take the cabbage away from bigos and nobody will notice a bit of difference.
Red borscht also contains one redundant ingredient - red beets :)
jonni 16 | 2,485
29 Jan 2011  #17
A shot of vodka is an appropriate addition to festive meals and help you to digest the food.

Years ago. Not so much nowadays.
chichimera 1 | 186
4 Feb 2011  #18
Not so much nowadays.

sure. modern poles prefer jack daniels :)
ChrisPoland 2 | 123
4 Feb 2011  #19
According to my mother-in-law it would be salt, vegeta and lard ;)
Matyjasz 2 | 1,544
12 Jun 2011  #20
Never understood this - it seems to me that the food itself is just a variation on the typical Northern European diet - meat, potatoes and vegetables, with a heart-attack inducing amount of salt.

Or a heart-attack inducing amount of vegeta. :)

During the commie times people cooked from the ingredients that were available on the market, and we all know how the shelves in the shops looked like in those times. These days people cook from the ingredients they can afford... I always love it when someone writes here on PF that Poles only love chicken and pork. It's not really a case of love but of the size of your wallet. Few months back I read somewhere that a statistical Pole ate 7kg beef per year in 1989, while these days it's only around 1kg. How many people eat duck these days? Rabbit? Crawfish? Nutria? :)

The contemporary polish cuisine is a pre-WW 2 peasant cuisine, that got bastardized by the lack of resources during the commie period, that got further bastardized during the 90's by the unhealthy novelties like maggi, aforementioned vegeta and the likes of kostka rosołowa. The major influences of the 2000's are Vietnamese pho soup in Warsaw and kebab/gyros in the province. :)

Still, there is lots to be discovered and to fall back on. The things that I always miss when abroad are dark beer from my region (Fortuna Czarne being my favourite), home-made nalewki, cold meats with fruits in jelly and proper sausage (that is one from your local butcher and not that stuff from the super-market), wątrobianka (liver pate?) with a cucumber "mało solny" on it, bread with proper smalec, my mother-in-laws mother-in-laws szarlotka ;), pyzy with duck and mizeria ( not the ready-made stuff available in every corner shop), "miodownik", "pijak" and of course the humble "placek drożdżowy". For over twenty years I have been immune to it's charm, and then suddenly it stroke me! I guess you could call me a "placek drożdżowy" addict!
Polsyr 6 | 769
18 Jun 2015  #21
Ok people I have a question about Polish cuisine!

Potatoes. In particular the varieties grown in Poland. Can someone tell me about them and what is better for what?
Looker - | 1,022
18 Jun 2015  #22
I don't know any other Polish potatoes than we can see in the shops and markets. It's usually two types: the regular and the early potatoes ;)
jon357 63 | 14,134
18 Jun 2015  #23
Poland has waxy and floury like most places, however most are waxy, which I like
DominicB - | 2,675
18 Jun 2015  #24
Bryza- superb, full nutty flavor and chewy, meaty flesh. The only good variety I have ever met in Poland. Similar to Bintjes, if not the same. Good for any purpose, though not fluffy when mashed (which is fine by me).

Irga and Astra- mediocre, blander starchier potatoes

Wineta and Denar- AWFUL, watery and tasteless, but make mashed potatoes that looked good. Why these are popular on the market, God only knows.

When I lived in Skierniewice, between Warsaw and £ódź, Bryza were popular and plentiful, as well as Irga and Astra.

Then I moved to Wrocław, only Winety and Denary were available, and Bryzy were not to be found at any price. It was terrible until we found a outside source for Bryzy.
Polsyr 6 | 769
19 Jun 2015  #25
Thank you fellows :) I actually took some notes.
lf99
19 Jun 2015  #26
Cabbage!

They put that s**t on everything!
Kamaz
19 Jun 2015  #27
I watch the TV guy with the yellow Syrena, who cooks a lot of 'wild' food......his recipies are superb......but being a Brit I substitute the Garlic with onions (wild garlic) or chives.....He does overdo the garlic a bit (sorry that was a bit of a joke over do!!!!! the man,s a maniac with garlic!!)......I can tell you the food is still superb without the garlic...if you follow the recipie and the way he cooks it. (Sorry I can,t remember his name) always watch him on TV when I can.


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