The Ultimate Guide to POLAND
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POLISH RECIPES!

Roger5 Activity: 1 / 1,303
Joined: 26 May 2014 ♂
 
21 Apr 2015  #241

such cake (apples with cinnamon) is declined in all western cultures.

It's never declined when I'm around. Best served warm with vanilla ice cream and good coffee. We mustn't forget the other Szarlotka: Żubrówka vodka and apple juice.

Wulkan Activity: - / 3,093
Joined: 28 Dec 2007 ♂
 
22 Apr 2015  #242

"Szarlotka" is not a Polish recipe, such cake (apples with cinnamon) is declined in all western cultures.

Nobody said it's strictly Polish, every European culture does it in a slightly different way.
johnny reb Activity: 10 / 2,154
Joined: 30 Jul 2014 ♂
 
22 Apr 2015  #243

such cake (apples with cinnamon) is declined in all western cultures

Who told you that ?
My Polish grandma always made me something very similiar. (Bless her heart)
The difference is the apples are covered with a mixer of brown sugar, flour, oats and butter.
3/4 th cup of brown sugar
1/2 cup of flour
1/2 cup of oats
1/3 cup of butter
3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
3/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
Mix together and sprinkle over apples and bake 30 minutes at 375*.
Served alamode with a cup of joe. Yummy !
Polonius3 Activity: 978 / 11,641
Joined: 11 Apr 2008 ♂
 
29 Apr 2015  #244

This sounds a lot like the very English Apple Crumble aka Apple Betty?!
Gosc123456  
29 Apr 2015  #245

@johnny: just travel and you'll see such cakes with apples and cinnamon are in most European cooking cultures.
rozumiemnic Activity: 9 / 2,955
Joined: 16 Nov 2009 ♀
 
30 Apr 2015  #246

that is what we call 'Apple Crumble' here in the UK where it is considered to be a national dish.
maybe your Granny was really English Johnny? lol.
johnny reb Activity: 10 / 2,154
Joined: 30 Jul 2014 ♂
 
30 Apr 2015  #247

maybe your Granny was really English Johnny?

Oh My Gosh No ! She was way to sweet to have been.
I have her old cook book, however, most of her old recipe's are hand writtem in Polish.
I can't read Polish yet so rely on my Polish buddies here to help me out.
They tell me that she had perfect penmanship and spelling.
rozumiemnic Activity: 9 / 2,955
Joined: 16 Nov 2009 ♀
 
30 Apr 2015  #248

I have her old cook book, however, most of her old recipe's are hand writtem in Polish.

lol no it is Old English
johnny reb Activity: 10 / 2,154
Joined: 30 Jul 2014 ♂
 
30 Apr 2015  #249

Our recipe came from Poland immigrants.
The recipe most likely was stolen by England from Poland and
renamed "Apple Crumble" like it was inherited from Poland to America
where it is now called "Apple Crisp".
rozumiemnic Activity: 9 / 2,955
Joined: 16 Nov 2009 ♀
 
30 Apr 2015  #250

The recipe most likely was stolen by England from Poland

dont be sillier than you have to be Johnny
Roger5 Activity: 1 / 1,303
Joined: 26 May 2014 ♂
 
30 Apr 2015  #251

This is representative of various opinions on the net.

"Crumbles originated in Britain during the 2nd World War. As there was strict rationing the ingredients needed to create the bases of a normal pie weren't available. Pies would require too much flour, sugar and fat to make the pastry. So people in the 2nd World War got creative and made a simple mixture of flour, margarine and sugar and used this to make the top of the crumble. The dish is also popular due to its simplicity." Source: moonfruit.com"

The recipe most likely was stolen by England from Poland

That's an instant PF classic.
Crow Activity: 130 / 5,547
Joined: 14 Feb 2007 ♂
 
30 Apr 2015  #252

This is definitely most beautiful thread here. i mean really. Polish cuisine is so delicious
Gosc123456  
30 Apr 2015  #253

@Crow: where you come from you must eat crap if you think Polish "cooking" is "delicious". It is poor, boring, heavy, greasy, tasteless.....
Crow Activity: 130 / 5,547
Joined: 14 Feb 2007 ♂
 
30 Apr 2015  #254

no, no, Polish food is perfect. Kind of exotic for us Serbs. Plus, you always have that moment that everything what coming from Poland seams fascinating.

BDW, Polish cuisine is more and more popular in Serbia. That PIROG is shocking stuff
f stop Activity: 25 / 2,636
Joined: 9 Dec 2009 ♀
 
30 Apr 2015  #255

Gosc123456, I'm confused.
You said that such cakes are DECLINED by most western cultures.
Surely you didn't mean that.
Decline = reject, refuse
Crow Activity: 130 / 5,547
Joined: 14 Feb 2007 ♂
 
30 Apr 2015  #256

You said that such cakes are DECLINED by most western cultures.

Poland is not just western. Being of Sarmatian origin, Poland is core of the core of the very essence of the core of the West.
johnny reb Activity: 10 / 2,154
Joined: 30 Jul 2014 ♂
 
30 Apr 2015  #257

Crumbles originated in Britain during the 2nd World War

I beg to differ as you can see from this article which proves the recipe originated in the United States twenty years
before WW2.
Most likely copied from my Polish grandmothers recipe book that she brought from Poland and not credited to the Polish people.
The earliest reference to apple crisp in print occurs in 1924, with a recipe in the Everybody's Cook Book:
A Comprehensive Manual of Home Cookery: New York 1924 (p. 239).
In 1924, apple crisp also makes an appearance in a newspaper article in the Appleton Post Crescent on Tuesday, December 9, 1924 (Appleton, Wisconsin).
Despite its relatively recent invention, apple crisp or crumble has become an American and British tradition especially during the autumn, when apples are plentiful.

DominicB Activity: - / 1,453
Joined: 28 Sep 2012 ♂
 
1 May 2015  #258

The recipe most likely was stolen by England from Poland and
renamed "Apple Crumble" like it was inherited from Poland to America
where it is now called "Apple Crisp".

Actually, not that far off the mark. See below.

the recipe originated in the United States twenty years
before WW2.

And is, like Polish Szarlotka, undoubtedly borrowed from German cuisine, as are many American foods. Curiously, from Silesia, which is now in Poland, according to this article:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Streuselkuchen
jon357 Activity: 53 / 10,844
Joined: 15 Mar 2012 ♂
 
1 May 2015  #259

A long way off the mark. Szarlotka is very different and not a crumble. Crumbles go back many centuries in England. They should traditionally be made with rolled oats. Very different from the Polish cake Szarlotka which is closer to the French tradition - a simpler version of Apple Charlotte (they even borrowed the name).

The Polish one, not in any way a crumble is only made with apples, and many would say has to be (or ought to be) made with one specific type of apples.

Things can go the other way too though. Alsatian Choucroute is directly based on Polish bigos, with the addition (and great improvement) of wine.
Gosc123456  
1 May 2015  #260

@Jon: Alsacian choucroute is very different from bigos and looks like German sauerkraut ;). Alsacian choucroute is made with (white) wine or beer (people's choice) and is always served with potatoes and tons of pork meat (saussage, "petit salé" ..;). To compare with bigos means that you have never been to Alsace ....
jon357 Activity: 53 / 10,844
Joined: 15 Mar 2012 ♂
 
1 May 2015  #261

Because they adapted it over the years to local tastes and ingredients. The origin is Polish and it moved west after the Napoleonic wars.

Tarts Tropezienne, about as French as it gets also has its origins in Poland, though not now recognisable as a Polish recipe.
Gosc123456  
1 May 2015  #262

@Jon: believe me, French cooking does not need Polish cooking ;). As to Tarte Tropézienne, the only connection with Poland is that the baker's wife who invented it was (or is, if still alive) Polish. Furthermore, that so called Tarte tropézienne is completely unknown outside of Saint-Tropez.
jon357 Activity: 53 / 10,844
Joined: 15 Mar 2012 ♂
 
1 May 2015  #263

believe me, French cooking does not need Polish cooking

I don't believe you as it happens. Cooking, whatever the countries involved is a process of constantly borrowing, adapting and improving. Choucroute Polonnaise is an improvement on bigos, brought back by soldiers who'd served in the Grand Armée.

. As to Tarte Tropézienne, the only connection with Poland is that the baker's wife who invented it was (or is, if still alive) Polish. Furthermore, that so called Tarte tropézienne is completely unknown outside of Saint-Tropez

Double rubbish. Either ignorance, trolling or both. It has nothing to do with anybody's wife; it was based on an old family recipe, and if you google it, you'll notice how bizarre your second 'point' is - it's actually very well-known throughout France and beyond.

It would be interesting to know the original Polish recipe and what the nearest equivalent is in PL today.
Roger5 Activity: 1 / 1,303
Joined: 26 May 2014 ♂
 
1 May 2015  #264

the recipe originated in the United States

I thought it was Polish.

Most likely copied from my Polish grandmothers recipe book

Oh, right.
rozumiemnic Activity: 9 / 2,955
Joined: 16 Nov 2009 ♀
 
1 May 2015  #265

It is poor, boring, heavy, greasy, tasteless.....

that is a bit unfair, some Polish dishes are delicious.
I really like the salads, bigos, schabowy, pierogi. Not all together of course! oh and that lovely poppy seed cake!
Roger5 Activity: 1 / 1,303
Joined: 26 May 2014 ♂
 
1 May 2015  #266

Potato pancakes (with Bisto gravy!). It's a commonplace that Polish soups are great. A local eatery where I live used to have eighteen soups and two wines on the menu. Flaczki is wonderful.
rozumiemnic Activity: 9 / 2,955
Joined: 16 Nov 2009 ♀
 
1 May 2015  #267

yes the soups are lovely, esp barszcz which I often used to make at home.
not sure about the Flaki tbh......lol. each to their own I suppose it is just liquid haggis.
Roger5 Activity: 1 / 1,303
Joined: 26 May 2014 ♂
 
1 May 2015  #268

I have noticed that most women turn their nose up at tripe soup, usually on aesthetic rather than culinary grounds. "Liquid haggis". What an insult to both noble dishes. Well, you have the red water, and I'll have the cow stomach soup.

My mother-in-law makes the lightest imaginable faworki. A little vodka in the mixture prevents the faworki absorbing oil, apparrently.

pie and mash

eels in liquor

No, stop, my mouth is watering. I come from pie 'n' mash country. I think Manzie's is still open in Woolwich, and Goddard's in Greenwich, hard by the Cutty Sark. But you don't really want to know that, do you Roz?

little pastry twists dusted with icing sugar

Yes. There are some very nice google images.
Lwowskie Baciar  
31 May 2015  #269

Flaki delicious! And so healthy! But quite a lot of garlic needs to be added to give it a lift.

Polish Apple Charlotte, on the other hand (staropolska) is not made with cinnamon - this would be too American! The filling is made by putting butter into a pan with apples, finely grated lemon skin, sugar and sultanas. The pastry is made with 6oz trex (shortening), 2x more self raising flour 12oz, 1 whole egg 1 egg yolk, 3oz sugar, 1 whole orange peel finely grated, almond drops, teaspoon of BP and 1-2 tablespoons of natural yoghurt. The trex, self raising flour and BP make the pastry so incredibly light. Try this for a true Polish treat! :D

Polish food if cooked at home and from the heart is the best cuisine in the world! ;)
Shizuka Activity: 10 / 43
Joined: 6 Jun 2013 ♀
 
31 May 2015  #270

Before I moved to Poland,I liked trying to make Polish food(Pierogi,Potate pancake,Mleko Pasta),but after I moved,never tried,even don't go any polish restaurants..(before,I did)

As reading those threads,making me feel like I want to try again :)




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