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POLISH RECIPES!


Teffle 22 | 1,321
12 Sep 2011 #211
There's an Irish county that has a similar vibe:

Hi - Coleslaw Wicklow, pleased to meet you.
gumishu 11 | 5,878
12 Sep 2011 #212
Whenever I see this, I think it looks like a Polish name, lol

I heard Polish people call it Kolesław :)
karysma61
12 Sep 2011 #213
I have tried several variations of the Polish coleslaw recipes and experimented with the ingredients to try and find that particular flavour but with no luck. Most list celery seeds, which I had at first thought were mustard seeds and some even list shredded fennel or fennel seeds. I have tried them all and my grocery bill is escalating at an alarming rate lol. I have even driven to different towns to search all local Polish deli's in the hope of finding it :)
gumishu 11 | 5,878
12 Sep 2011 #214
I have even driven to different towns to search all local Polish deli's in the hope of finding it :)

you may be more lucky with French and Italian delis - celery seeds are not a traditional Polish ingredient, I have actually never seen them in shop - just read about them and maybe the coleslaw you had made use of them because there seems to be some trade in them in Poland
Seanus 15 | 19,706
12 Sep 2011 #215
You can buy Marwit's coleslaw in Żabka and it's also available in Tesco stores.
gumishu 11 | 5,878
12 Sep 2011 #216
what is Marwit's coleslaw - is Marwit a company/brand ?
Seanus 15 | 19,706
12 Sep 2011 #217
Yes, it is a brand with a slightly varied product line.
Sidliste_Chodov 1 | 441
12 Sep 2011 #218
I heard Polish people call it Kolesław :)

My point exactly, lol.

Polish shops near me never seem to have this soup; fortunately, there are plenty of shops locally which do :)
Cardno85 31 | 976
13 Sep 2011 #219
Polish shops near me never seem to have this soup; fortunately, there are plenty of shops locally which do :)

Not sure what the soup has to do with Coleslaw, but it doesn't seem to be very Polish as a brand or as a name. Maybe check out a Jewish Deli or something because the brand has a Hebrew sound to it and the name is using non-Polish names.
beckski 12 | 1,617
13 Sep 2011 #220
the brand has a Hebrew sound to it

Manischewitz food products are sold in the Kosher section of local Stater Bros. Markets. Their potato pancake packages sure save time in the kitchen. Also beats having to peel those starchy potatoes.



Cardno85 31 | 976
13 Sep 2011 #221
Also beats have to peel those starchy potatoes.

I think I'm one of the few people in the world who like peeling potatoes. Wierd that I don't like eating them (even chips!!!)
f stop 25 | 2,513
13 Sep 2011 #222
I think polish coleslaw has more sugar, and more vinegar. Sometimes grated apple. Everybody has their own recipe, tho.
Szczaw, or soup from it, like in the jar in the picture, it's hard to believe somebody would package! I've heard that during the occupation, when you had nothing left to eat, you'd make a soup from it, which was a common weed in the yard. And I don't think that acid is good for you.
Sidliste_Chodov 1 | 441
13 Sep 2011 #223
Not sure what the soup has to do with Coleslaw

It's not a coleslaw thread though, lol.

but it doesn't seem to be very Polish as a brand or as a name.

It's the Jewish version of a Polish soup, zupa szczawiowa.

I live within a few minutes walk of half a dozen Polish businesses, and twice as many Jewish stores. For some reason, certain Polish foods aren't that easily available in the Polish shops (I'm sure that some of them are just a front for some "other" kind of business hehe, since when did Poles just live on packet soups and cakes anyway? lol) so I get the rest of my "Polish" food from the Jewish stores. It's not as good as my mum used to make, but it will do; it's not something I eat every week anyway.

I make most of my own food, but a few Polish dishes aren't worth the effort, as the ready-made or packet version can be as good, and sometimes just as cheap. This is one of them ;)

Manischewitz food products are sold in the Kosher section of local Stater Bros. Markets. Their potato pancake packages sure save time in the kitchen. Also beats having to peel those starchy potatoes.

Indeed. I use a packet version for my placki/latkes; as you say, it's less work. The best brands also have a flavour which is very close to the real thing. I would never buy "instant" English food, but for some reason, Polish/Jewish packet foods have really nice flavours. Telma Krupnik is better than my mum's! lol
louicky
13 Oct 2011 #224
how a bout Zrazy?? We had them in Poland...beef rolled around sliced pickles and.....???
gumishu 11 | 5,878
13 Oct 2011 #225
beef rolled around sliced pickles and.....???

a piece of onion and a strip of good Polish sausage - served with their own dark sauce (I get thickened a bit) - they are cooked in a covered pot in an oven but don;t ask me how should they be kept there and what temperature (my guess is 200 degrees for more than half an hour)
beckski 12 | 1,617
13 Oct 2011 #226
a piece of onion and a strip of good Polish sausage - served with their own dark sauce

Another good simple recipe that I could whip up quickly.
calcedonia 4 | 67
14 Oct 2011 #227
Polish seafood I never heard, please can you tell me Baltic sea fishes how many kind,and which is best one, and how polish cook fishes usualy boiled or grill or fried? And there are other seafood like calamary, mussels,octopus,shrimp in Baltic sea? Last one is there good seafood restaurant?
Natasa 1 | 580
14 Oct 2011 #228
Gilt- head bream on the grill with olive oil and a bits of parsley served and devoured with boiled chard and potato, pieces of garlic and lemon juice. Unpolish I'm afraid, but tasty :))
gumishu 11 | 5,878
14 Oct 2011 #229
Polish seafood I never heard, please can you tell me Baltic sea fishes how many kind,and which is best one, and how polish cook fishes usualy boiled or grill or fried? And there are other seafood like calamary, mussels,octopus,shrimp in Baltic sea? Last one is there good seafood restaurant?

no shrimp - once fresh water crayfish were common as rivers and lakes were very clean and before invasive crayfish were somehow introduced (which are not that good and don't grow as big)

no calmars and octopi in Baltic, some mussels perahps but they have never been popular

the popular Baltic fish are herring, cod, plaice, sprats
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
16 Oct 2011 #230
I can't imagine any powdered mix (pancakes, soups, wheatevr) holding a candle to the real thing. In Polish there is a saying about placki kartoflane: Jak nie tatre to g*wno warte!
Nannerlh60 2 | 23
10 Mar 2012 #231
Oh, oh, laughing so hard it hurts. Reference the "Elephant Stew" Is this dish better the next day?
busha
4 Jul 2013 #232
OMG !! Your elephant recipe is histerical!!!
RevokeNice 15 | 1,859
7 Sep 2013 #233
My sister and her partner stayed with me last night. I got up early to make them eggs Benedict and messed the dish up. Added bacon, spinach, potato cake and hollandaise sauce. Foooked it up. Deeply embarrassed. They ate it, but I could tell they didnt enjoy it.

The dude is coola boola. A guest in my abode. Id like to cook him a nice meal before I bring him to the football later. One lads username inspired me - pierogi! I could cook him a lovely piece of steak, a curr
FinnFelton 1 | 2
18 Sep 2013 #234
I'm haven't known anything about Polish food and this thread is very useful for me because I have learned new dishes to make. I will definitely try snake steak at home someday.
ahanna2430
19 Apr 2014 #235
I learned growing up to scramble a dozen eggs with 1 quart of whole milk and whisk to combine. Cook in a large pot over medium heat stirring constantly until you see what looks like scrambled eggs and water. Pour the mixture into a large strainer lined with a large cheese cloth. The water will strain through the cheesecloth and the eggs will take on the shape of the bowl. Tie the ends of the cheesecloth together to hang (either over the faucet or on a cabinet door handle, etc.) so the water will continue to slowly drip from the cheesecloth. My parents would make this the evening before Easter Sunday, then place in the refrigerator the next morning for Easter brunch or dinner. The dish, I was taught was called "Sedek", was certainly a European, I believe Polish dish, passed down from my mother's side of the family. When the egg dish is placed upside down on it's flat side, you have an "egg ball" that is sliced and served when cool. I can't imagine this dish ever being warm because it would lose it's shape. I suppose, you could warm a slice but it seems it was intended to be served cold.
buffy
11 Jul 2014 #236
Merged: Simple recipes for cooking Polish food?

can somebody show me some recipes or show point to some links? I want the easy-to-do for beginners kind of thing to cook.
johnny reb 31 | 6,461
4 Aug 2014 #237
Give this one a try buffy. It's got some easy-to-do like potato pancakes.

easteuropeanfood.about.com/od/polishnoodlesanddumpling/r/Gwizdaly-Potato-Pancakes.htm

Warning: These are not low calorie and tend to cause extreme weight gain.
lorrainep - | 1
21 Apr 2015 #238
do you have the recipe SZARLOTKA ( apple pie with cream filling
Gosc123456
21 Apr 2015 #239
"Szarlotka" is not a Polish recipe, such cake (apples with cinnamon) is declined in all western cultures.
jon357 69 | 18,445
21 Apr 2015 #240
The Polish one is specific in that it needs Antonówka apples and the topping has to be done the right way. Plenty of recipes online.


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