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What's up with all the Georgian food in Poland now?


mafketis 23 | 8,527
21 Aug 2019 #1
Where I live a couple of Georgian (gruziński) bakeries have opened up but I was just in Warsaw and Georgian food places were all over the place... I was staying close to the station and I counted something like 8 within easy walking distance of my hotel...

Is this going on in other cities? I looked a little and can't find much information on why Georgians are suddenly interested in moving to Poland... Or are they not Georgian at all (the way that 'Chinese' restaurants used to be run by Vietnamese and the first sushi places were run by Koreans)?

Anyone got any info on what's up?
pawian 171 | 12,081
21 Aug 2019 #2
Apart from a Georgian female student who came to us with Comenius lectures a few years ago, I know no Georgians.
jon357 63 | 15,053
21 Aug 2019 #3
There's more and more Georgian wine for sale now; not all of it good.
cms neuf - | 1,664
21 Aug 2019 #4
I can think of about 10 in Warsaw - some belonging to a chain. I never had a sit down meal at any of them - somehow worried it won't fill me up!

I have eaten a few times several years ago in the one around the corner from the Polonia Palace

There are also a few Caucasian bakers around - I have bought some things, which are fairly stodgy and overpriced compared to Polish equivalents but not bad.

I have seen a few in other towns. In the former Soviet union Georgia iwas renowned for its cuisine and in most of the old capitals of Soviet states like in Vilnius, Riga etc. you will find a few Georgian restaurants
Dirk diggler 9 | 4,532
21 Aug 2019 #5
Well there is a decent sized georgian population in poland...
DominicB - | 2,704
22 Aug 2019 #6
I think it has more to do with the even more sizable Ukrainian population.

Though, come to think of it, the Chaczapuri chain restaurants appeared before the influx of Ukrainians. Perhaps their success inspired others to follow in their footsteps.
OP mafketis 23 | 8,527
22 Aug 2019 #7
I think it has more to do with the even more sizable Ukrainian

Well the people in the Georgian bakery I sometimes go to are definitely not Ukrainian (their Polish is often not very good but not in ways typical for Ukrainian or Russian speakers).

The place I went to in Warsaw had music playing that sounded.... I'm not sure what it sounded like but not what I would think Georgian music sounded like (though I have no idea what Georgian music would sound like....) the rhythms sounded Bulgarian at times.

I was just wondering if there's been some kind of systematic migration of Georgians to Poland or it's some other group like Chechens (they from what I know they don't seem like the hardworking in a store type....)
cms neuf - | 1,664
22 Aug 2019 #8
I think since the direct connections to Tbilisi with LOT it has now become a bit of a trendy holiday for Warsaw hipsters - a few weeks ago I spoke to a guy who had been on a bachelor party there. Also went to a dinner party this summer and the host had been to Georgia and his wife made some dishes which were excellent.

in the 90s there was quite a community of Armenians, some pretty shady but plenty of legit guys. they used to have some kebab places round X-lecia stadium which were excellent (at least compared to the culinary standards of 90s Poland !!)
OP mafketis 23 | 8,527
22 Aug 2019 #9
in the 90s there was quite a community of Armenians

Armenians have historically assimilated pretty thoroughly in Poland (unless they're just commuting or if Poland is a stop on a road leading further westward).

A bit of googling suggested that things are still pretty chancy in Georgia and tensions with Russia remain high (a good lesson for those posters here who want Poland to re-enter the Russian orbit and become a vassal state again).

I think it might be just that, better connections and Georgians looking for an easy plan B in case things really go south....
Atch 17 | 3,232
22 Aug 2019 #10
There's a Georgian bakery near me in Warsaw and the guys working there are definitely Georgian, also another very small place doing hot savoury pastries run by a Georgian couple. I know she's Georgian because I asked her where she was from :-) Probably the same people who have the larger bakery.

was just wondering if there's been some kind of systematic migration of Georgians to Poland

Next time you have a chance to chat with a Georgian, ask them.

Armenians

Still quite a few of them around in Warsaw, mostly older ones who've been trading here for years. One cheeky old duffer told me that my Polish should be better after all the time I've spent in Poland :-D
OP mafketis 23 | 8,527
22 Aug 2019 #11
I know she's Georgian because I asked her where she was from :-)

That's a very anglophone thing to do and I used to do that before I found out that lots of people from other cultures find it very rude and insensitive, and in countries which were communist within living memory it could set off people's warning systems so I avoid it now.

old duffer told me that my Polish should be better after all the time I've spent in Poland

Czy ma rację?
Atch 17 | 3,232
22 Aug 2019 #12
Niestety, tak :))

That's a very anglophone thing to do and I used to do that

Well, I think people don't mind so much when they can see that you're also a foreigner, but you have a point. Also maybe, when it's a woman doing the asking, they're less defensive. Plus of course I have the old Hibernian way "Your pastries are delicious. I never ate a Georgian pastry before - and you're Georgian yourself,are you? Oh, wonderful, so it's real authentic cuisine". By which time, they're all smiles, unless of course there's a queue forming behind me :-D You have to choose your moment carefully, when there's a lull in trade. I'm not actually being nosy for the sake of it though. I'm genuinely interested in people.


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