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Is Polish food still more natural than in the West?


zetigrek
7 Sep 2010 #61
I cannot BBQ the average Polish sausage as the water and fat content turns it into a firework

sausage=parówka? or sausage=kiełbasa??? Kiełbasa is very good for bbq. What kind of kiełbasa was it?
Teffle 22 | 1,321
7 Sep 2010 #62
Not sure Zetigrek - supplied by friends. The outer skin is "orange-brown" and it seemed to be customary to slit it a few times across the width. Looked quite like German wurst - sound familiar?

BTW, it tasted good anyway whatever it was.
zetigrek
7 Sep 2010 #63
The outer skin is "orange-brown"

well almost every kiełbasa has orange brown skin ;)

Kiełbasa

Parówka

Parówka is made of fat and other wastes, while kiełbasa is made of meat. There are lots of kiełbasa kinds, e.g.:

-krakowska is the driest (according to wikipedia; 36% of water)
-żywiecka (36-55% of water)
-serdelowa, zwyczajna (up to 72% of water)
Teffle 22 | 1,321
7 Sep 2010 #64
Didn't look particularly like either but more so the second one. Can't be sure though.

And by the way:

Parówka is made of fat and other wastes

So is this the same natural and healthy Polish food or food from a differnt Poland in a parallel universe or something? ; )

I don't think there is actually an English name for it besides fat bacon

Sounds like you are talking about what is known in English as "dripping".

Very popular with poorer people (especially in the north of England) up until the early 60s or so. Consumed the same way too. It still exists.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
7 Sep 2010 #65
Have you been inspecting kiełbaski again, Zeti? ;) ;)

Is Polish food still more natural? Largely, yes. Poland prefers not to use preservatives (no, the Church has said nothing on this type) and has unpasteurised substances too.
zetigrek
7 Sep 2010 #66
Didn't look particularly like either but more so the second one. Can't be sure though.

oh I know it was kiełbasa zwyczajna:

So is this the same natural and healthy Polish food or food from a differnt Poland in a parallel universe or something? ; )

Well parówka was always consider as a kind of junk food. Just look where you can find it:

hot dog

Have you been inspecting kiełbaski again, Zeti? ;) ;)

yes, exactly this weekend ;)
bimber94 7 | 254
7 Sep 2010 #67
Anyone tried kaszanka? Made with delicious congealed pig's blood and barley.
convex 20 | 3,978
7 Sep 2010 #68
Planning on frying some up here in the next hour. I like it with eggs.
zetigrek
7 Sep 2010 #69
Anyone tried kaszanka? Made with delicious congealed pig's blood and barley.

I hate kaszanka.

Btw who wants to unproceesed meat with unproceesed egg (in a literally way)??? ;D

Here you are!
Seanus 15 | 19,706
7 Sep 2010 #70
How were they, salty? ;) Did you try any of those black ones? They have a strange bend in them ;)

How much did you try?
Teffle 22 | 1,321
7 Sep 2010 #71
Anyone tried kaszanka? Made with delicious congealed pig's blood and barley

I love it. It's the best type of blood sausage I've had. But no eggs thanks!

kiełbasa zwyczajna

I think so. Looks and sounds familiar.
monika87 - | 55
7 Sep 2010 #72
Is Polish food still more natural? Largely, yes. Poland prefers not to use preservatives (no, the Church has said nothing on this type) and has unpasteurised substances too.

zgadzam się całkowicie
convex 20 | 3,978
7 Sep 2010 #73
Poland prefers not to use preservatives

The lines of people buying crap meat in the supermarkets seems to contradict that observation :)
Polanglik 11 | 303
7 Sep 2010 #74
Seanus: Poland prefers not to use preservatives.

The lines of people buying crap meat in the supermarkets seems to contradict that observation :)

Here in England there are weekly Farmers Markets, where they claim the food is fresh and mostly organically grown.

In Poland I have noticed there are many more, and not just 'once a week' markets where fresh produce can be bought.

One of the differences I see is the price; in Poland the freshly produced markets are priced quite cheaply compared to the supermarkets, whilst in England the prices paid at the Farmers Markets are similar in price or in many cases more expensive than at the supermarkets.

There is also a great variety at the Polish Markets, and one can usually taste the produce before buying it. The meat and other produce usually tastes much better from the market than supermarket.

When in Warsaw, I love buying the fresh produce from markets such as Plac Szembeka which is Praga Południe; it's a bit of a trek from my flat in Wilanow but having friends just round the corner makes it a good excuse to pay them a visit!
convex 20 | 3,978
7 Sep 2010 #75
When in Warsaw, I love buying the fresh produce from markets such as Plac Szembeka which is Praga Południe; it's a bit of a trek from my flat in Wilanow but having friends just round the corner makes it a good excuse to pay them a visit!

For locally grown produce, that's true. A good portion of what's for sale at markets here in Wroclaw are the same imported products that are sitting in the store shelves. Just take a look at the wooden boxes that they come in :) Spain, Morocco, and Holland seem to be common names.
monika87 - | 55
7 Sep 2010 #76
When in Warsaw, I love buying the fresh produce from markets such as Plac Szembeka which is Praga Południe

Very true, I think in Poland are a lot markets you can buy very fresh vegetables, fruits, meat, fish and so on. I do not know exactly how it looks in the other countries, but in Poland these markets are very often and popular - as they was always been, since my great-great-grandmother times :-)
Seanus 15 | 19,706
7 Sep 2010 #77
Poland does well in this regard. I love the markets with fresh and natural products. Plenty goodness there :)
monika87 - | 55
7 Sep 2010 #78
In Poland I have noticed there are many more, and not just 'once a week' markets where fresh produce can be bought.

yess, right
Teffle 22 | 1,321
7 Sep 2010 #79
Yes, strangely enough I am familiar with this concept of "the market" also. ; )

My local town (approx. 5000 pop.) has two and between them they are open 7 days a week.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
7 Sep 2010 #80
We are not talking about beer stalls, Teffle ;0 ;)

You see the bad foreign influences here. Most notably, panga. That Vietnamese crap is filled with toxins and is barely fit for consumption. Cod, on the other hand, exudes freshness and some would insist on nothing less than total purity.
Teffle 22 | 1,321
7 Sep 2010 #81
We are not talking about beer stalls, Teffle ;0 ;)

Yeah, a disproportionate amount of them too. The permanent ones that is - not the stalls ; ) And 7 days a week? practically 24 hrs a day in some cases.

Serious question: cheese.

What is the Polish attitude or habits here?

My Polish friends seem to eat only (what I would regard as) very bland mild cheeses and when in Ireland seem to go out of their way to get stuff like e.g. Edam as opposed to a lovely mature cheese, farmhouse cheese or God forbid, a blue cheese.

I don't really remember having cheese at all when I was in Poland but I guess I probably did.

Is it a bit of a 'functional' item in Poland maybe - kind of the opposite of the UK/Ireland V Poland bread attitude?
Seanus 15 | 19,706
7 Sep 2010 #82
Cheeses here cannot compete with Irish/British/French/German cheeses. That is surprising as Polish dairy is some of the best in the world. There is Irish cheddar here :) Poles tend to eat rather bland food generally and add a lot of salt.
Wroclaw Boy
7 Sep 2010 #83
Cheeses here cannot compete with Irish/British/French/German cheeses.

I concur.
jonni 16 | 2,485
7 Sep 2010 #84
Poles tend to eat rather bland food generally and add a lot of salt.

Very true

hat is surprising as Polish dairy is some of the best in the world.

Not so sure about that - the Polish dairy industry is heavily industrialised.

Cheeses here cannot compete with Irish/British/French/German cheeses

One farm makes a range of real (i.e. not factory-made) cheeses. They have won prizes and their products are good, but mostly they export - there is little demand for good cheese in PL.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
7 Sep 2010 #85
Heavily industrialised or not, it still tastes good and is popular with consumers.

That's one aspect of Polish life. They have hidden gems. There are better beers than those advertised and known.

Cheese is either sth to be fried up or as a quick snack in the form of a sandwich. In Britain, cheddar is treated as an institution and isn't simply quaffed to fill a hole. I'd go spare if my wife fried up my cheddar here but as for those 7PLN blocks of random cheese she buys, she can go right ahead. The only thing with cheddar is artificial colourings. They seem to have many but I could be wrong. The one I eat here seems natural enough.
jonni 16 | 2,485
7 Sep 2010 #86
Heavily industrialised or not, it still tastes good

Until you read the label.

and is popular with consumers.

So are oven chips, Kubuś and Jogobella.
convex 20 | 3,978
7 Sep 2010 #87
One farm makes a range of real (i.e. not factory-made) cheeses. They have won prizes and their products are good, but mostly they export - there is little demand for good cheese in PL.

Stop being selfish, give us a name :)
jonni 16 | 2,485
7 Sep 2010 #88
If I could remember I would. My local shop stocked it for a week or so, but didn't sell much. They were on TV not long ago - a young-ish couple run the farm, and they won a prize in France, but unfortunately I can't remember much more.

If anywhere in PL stocks their stuff, it would be Piotr i Paweł.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
7 Sep 2010 #89
Read the label? Now why would I want to go and do sth like that? ;) ;) Seriously though, what's wrong with those products? They must pass certain health and also safety standards, quality notwithstanding. I'm happy to go with that.

Good for McCain, Kubuś and Jogobella I say :)
sascha 1 | 826
7 Sep 2010 #90
But the point is that you said that food in "western Europe" was more likely to be processed than in Poland - did you not?

Yes I did. Why? U don't agree?

Of course there is always an alternative. ;-)


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