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Your favourite Polish foods!


aphrodisiac 11 | 2,444
16 Jun 2012 #152
don't recall that product being sold in Poland;)
strzyga 2 | 993
16 Jun 2012 #154
This product was good

schab ze śliwką - pork loin with prunes
p3undone 8 | 1,135
16 Jun 2012 #155
It actually looks pretty damn good.

Strzyga,Thank you for posting that,I'm going to get to cracking on some of these dishes,in other words,get busy cooking lol.
strzyga 2 | 993
16 Jun 2012 #156
P3, if you're interested in desserts, check out this blog. Some of the recipes are translated into English. You'll find there both traditional Polish and international ones.

mojewypieki.blox.pl/html
p3undone 8 | 1,135
16 Jun 2012 #157
Thanks again strzyga,if I can see what their doing,then I'm all set.
jon357 63 | 14,261
20 Jun 2012 #158
What is Leczo

A summer stew made of bell peppers. When you see people leaving the supermarket here with huge bags of them in different colours, that's what they're usually going to make. Leczo also has kielbasa and onions in. It originally came from Hungary, but is common enough in Poland nowadays. There are two schools of thought about how long it should be cooked. I prefer it fairly lightly cooked, some people like to boil it down to a bigos-like mush. Frozen Leczo from the supermarket tends to be somewhere in between. The secret of making it is to tear the bell peppers rather than cut them. It's a seasonal dish because it uses so many peppers, it's only economical when they're at their cheapest. Delicious!

Actually, Curry is a British creation based on a variety of Indian dishes. Curry as it is served in Europe is very, very different to food in India. Anyway, Dessie, what's with the 'we Indians' stuff? Bought a wigwam?
p3undone 8 | 1,135
20 Jun 2012 #159
John357,Do you use any kind of stock or do you let the ingredients do the flavoring?
Harry
20 Jun 2012 #160
Anyway, Dessie, what's with the 'we Indians' stuff? Bought a wigwam?

Probably best that I make no comment on that.

Anyway, to get back to the topic, despite being neither a Pole nor a Jew, I do have a fondness for Jewish-Polish food, duck with horseradish, sorrel and raisin pie and, best of all, fruited rice pudding.
jon357 63 | 14,261
20 Jun 2012 #161
John357,Do you use any kind of stock or do you let the ingredients do the flavoring?

Personally I wouldn't. I add a small amount of water as necessary, but Leczo is one of those things that is nice because of the clean flavour. There are also usually tomatoes. Some people add zucchini, sugar and garlic though I don't.

Really, all it contains is a lot (in Poland they really do use a lot) of bell peppers, onions, tomatoes, kielbasa, paprika and a little salt.

Sometimes people serve it as an accompaniment to meat, and usually boil it to a mush. In my opinion it is good as a main dish itself, if it isn't boiled down too much.
p3undone 8 | 1,135
20 Jun 2012 #162
John357,Thank you,this sounds like a delicious stew,and easy to make!
jon357 63 | 14,261
20 Jun 2012 #163
The secret is to tear the peppers, never, ever cut them; to add any water later, to add the tomatoes later, and at first, just cook the peppers slowly in oil or smalec.
Harry
20 Jun 2012 #165
You don't know what sorrel is? Oy vey!

Seriously, it's a herb which is typical for Polish and Jewish food from these parts. The taste is quite sharp, a bit like unripe strawberries.
rybnik 18 | 1,462
20 Jun 2012 #166
Really, all it contains is a lot (in Poland they really do use a lot) of bell peppers, onions, tomatoes, kielbasa, paprika and a little salt.

perfect for the crockpot, no?

John357,Thank you,this sounds like a delicious stew,and easy to make!

Agreed! It has all the makings of a simple but tasy meal. I'm in; can't wait to get started :)
p3undone 8 | 1,135
20 Jun 2012 #167
Harry,I'd never even heard of the spice,It's not too common over here I don't suspect.Is it used in mainly desserts,or in other dishes as well?
Harry
20 Jun 2012 #168
It's a herb rather than a spice, mainly used for soups and sauces, and sometimes salads.
p3undone 8 | 1,135
20 Jun 2012 #169
Harry,Thanks for the info.
teflcat 5 | 1,032
20 Jun 2012 #170
Is it used in mainly desserts,or in other dishes as well?

Sorrel soup is very common where I live (in the east). Costs nothing to grow. Perhaps an acquired taste, but I liked it first time.
p3undone 8 | 1,135
20 Jun 2012 #171
Teflcat,I had no idea,that's cool to know.
Egon
26 Jun 2012 #172
I think what everyone seems to be forgetting here is that britain is and has, for the last few hundred years, been a melting pot of culinary culture. We emerged from peasant and basic inglenook cooking into an explosion of worldwide and rather bizarre dishes. Since the early years, Britains population has been made up mainly of 'other Europeans', all cooking the same way, meat on a spit, boiled turnips, just as bland as the rest of Europe. When we pilfered spices, fruit and slaves with their recipes from afar, we started to develop British cuisine. A true representation of the British Isles being 'anything goes'. The British kitchen is the most diverse in the world as we take from everywhere. The quality and choice is truly the creates. Yes we manufacture shite for the mass consumers but we do have the greatest Chef's and most world restaurants outside of the country of origin. We will always share the most liberated palettes thanks to our multicultural diversity.

The English Kitchen was transformed by the spice trade and after suffering 18 courses of varying delight, like spiced goose and jellied exotic fruit came the war and that's when our reputation for god-awful mince and potatoes really stuck to anyone either not from the U.K. or a foodie family.

A quality Sunday roast made well is an absolute delight, full of flavour and one of the most satisfying dishes you will pick at for hours after. Similarly a curry, wherever it's from, India, Thailand, indonesia etc also has a big place at he table. What we are getting at here is that in Poland, there is not nearly the variety that we are used to from the U.K. or U.S. or Australia even. There are Thai kitchens, curry restaurants and a plethora of Kebab grills etc but without the same history we have had in the U.K., the choices will be less. Polish food is great in it's own right but it's roots have long been in preserving harvests and getting through the winter months. That is now changing rapidly with the demand from the increasing expat communities but the attitude and taste of the Poles seems to remain loyal. You have to admire that but I think there is also an underlying intolerance to anything 'unusual' a little like us brits were in the 60's and 70's. We just lost touch after all that rationing, powdered egg and tripe. We were xenophobic and proud, now look at us!?!

Now, anyone for Kedgeree?
jon357 63 | 14,261
26 Jun 2012 #173
And we have more types of cheese than France!
gdyniaguy 1 | 281
26 Jun 2012 #174
That is now changing rapidly with the demand from the increasing expat communities but the attitude and taste of the Poles seems to remain loyal. You have to admire that but I think there is also an underlying intolerance to anything 'unusual' a little like us brits were in the 60's and 70's. We just lost touch after all that rationing, powdered egg and tripe. We were xenophobic and proud, now look at us!?!

Spot on... make a mockery of anybody that says that british cuisine is bland. The French in the middle ages employed english cooks to teach thier cooks. Infact dishes that sound foreign have been found to be english is there construction... Lasagna for example has been found in medieval cookbooks. Give me a good Steak and Ale pie over bigos or golombka anyday..Polish use herbs but apart from simple medieval spices like pepper and cinamon are useless when it comes to spicing foods.
MummyM - | 3
26 Jun 2012 #175
pierogi!! I used to love just the meat ones but I have gone onto potato and cheese now! Fried in a little butter.....yes please!! AND mizeria is my fav salad! :)
beckski 12 | 1,617
26 Jun 2012 #176
pierogi!! I used to love just the meat ones but I have gone onto potato and cheese now!

I also LOVE both mushroom & kapusta-filled
NorthMancPolak 4 | 648
26 Jun 2012 #177
Kedgeree?

Indian!

mizeria

Cucumber raita... Indian!!

Everything's Indian. Like "pundit". ;)

Or you think that you're English simply because you're called Dave? Dev = Indian!!! haha :)

I love pierogi too. But dim sum are Chinese, not Indian. Which makes a change! lmao :D

And while we're on subcontinent topics (even if off-topic), I must have eaten 10 lakh pierogi in my lifetime hahaha
gdyniaguy 1 | 281
28 Jun 2012 #178
pierogi

Dumplings/Pasties ... or italian ravioli!
Gregorius - | 3
17 Aug 2012 #179
Merged: What traditional Polish food do you like?

How in Subject. Do You coock at home Polish, write what.
Any one knows gut sites about polish cooking?
Rysavy 10 | 308
26 Mar 2013 #180
schabowy

debreeshin veptrovan... . It is pork cutlets that are breaded and braised...

Has anyone found a polish recipe site ans posted it yet?
Most things I cook often have Polish equivelents. Especially the Boheme/German dishes.
Many of the Portuguese dishes I cook are similar, but Polish dont seem to use tomato bases much nor have easy access to Hominey or chicpeas

ie: Menudo?- flezcki with spicy tomatoe base and hominey.


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