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Canadian Woman Moving To Warsaw


courtney0525 2 | 5  
2 Jul 2009 /  #1
Hi all,

I have been dating a Polish man from Warsaw.. he leaves to go back to Poland in a few weeks, however we have decided that I will be moving to Warsaw to be with him. I am a little bit nervous as I am from a small city in Canada, and will be making a big move and life change. I am just looking for some advice on things such as what living is like in Poland, Jobs for young english women.. and any other things anyone can think of! I read that I could teach english.. is knowing Polish mandatory? He says I do not need to work when I move to Poland, but I would rather work than stay home haha! Is that normal for men to work, and the women to stay home?!
frd 7 | 1,401  
2 Jul 2009 /  #2
Is that normal for men to work, and the women to stay home?!

It was a common family model and maybe still is in some parts of Poland, but most young couples follow the model of both partners working even if there's a toddler involved..

and I think it's better to work especially if you're in a new place, don't have any friends and activities, you would die of boredom or start having love affair with a neighbour or become addicted to internet.. : o
nauczyciel  
2 Jul 2009 /  #3
get your TESOL certificate then u can teach at many schools. Leave yourself options as your relationship could turn sour, when your BF is back with his buddies and you are realizing that every night you are left home alone while he is out in the park drinking Lechs.
terri 1 | 1,664  
2 Jul 2009 /  #4
>>>Leave yourself options
...Very wise advice. Always remember that he will be on HIS territory and you will be only a guest in his country, even though you may be living together.

Let us know how you get on in 6 months time.
mr cool  
3 Jul 2009 /  #5
nauczycie you're right,only black man drink and go home peacefully,Please don,t be
OP courtney0525 2 | 5  
3 Jul 2009 /  #6
Leave yourself options as your relationship could turn sour, when your BF is back with his buddies and you are realizing that every night you are left home alone while he is out in the park drinking Lechs.

i dont mind him drinking and what not.. that seems kind of harsh to say thats how he will be? is it normal for most men to do that?? he does not seem that way what so ever.. he is here on work.. thats how we met, my friend knew him before i met him, and she said once he met me he has calmed down ALOT! he usually wants to be with me every day!!

TESOL certificate? what is this, and where do i get it? i 100% want to work as i do understand that I will NEED to make friends of my own, and build some kind of life of my own.
mr cool  
3 Jul 2009 /  #7
I will NEED to make friends of my own,

yeah is cool,someone is down here waiting for you
z_darius 14 | 3,968  
3 Jul 2009 /  #8
TESOL certificate? what is this, and where do i get it?

It's know in Canada as teaching English as a second language.
You'll find a lot of academic debate on what particular shade of one or another certificate you should get. I'd say, just refresh your English grammar on a formal level (you need to know what a noun or a tense is). Your local college may offer a course or two that won't replace a full degree's curriculum but they may at least give you a solid understanding of what you need to get into. Check that out if you still have some time before you leave Canada.

Teaching English in Poland can be a source of a very decent income. Most of the time better than it is in Canada.
Harry  
3 Jul 2009 /  #9
You'll find a lot of academic debate on what particular shade of one or another certificate you should get.

Not here in Poland you won't. A Certificate in English Language Teaching to Adults from Cambridge University (a CELTA) is what all the schools here want to see from an inexperienced teacher. A Trinity College Cert TESOL will do but with any other course you're going to be left proving it is the equivilent of a CELTA. I know this because I spent 12 years teaching EFL in Poland and handled recruitment for a number of schools in Warsaw.

what is this, and where do i get it?

In Poland you can do the CELTA in Warsaw (at ELS Bell), in Krakow (at International House) and Wroclaw (at International House). The courses are much the same quality but the Warsaw course is significantly more expensive. I'd recommend against it unless you have free accommodation in central Warsaw.

One thing you do need to do is get your skates on. Prime recruiting time is the first half of September. But the CELTA takes a month to do. If you are in Warsaw with your CELTA done, I guarantee that you will get a job offer. In fact you will most probably be picking and choosing between offers: there simply aren't enough decent teachers to meet the demand here, and that's factoring in the sad fact that to most schools a decent teacher is one who always turns up on time and is prepared but is not drunk or hungover. As far as pay goes: work about 28 to 30 hours a week and you can easily pull in 6,000zl a month after tax.
z_darius 14 | 3,968  
3 Jul 2009 /  #10
A Certificate in English Language Teaching to Adults from Cambridge University (a CELTA) is what all the schools here want to see from an inexperienced teacher.

If one wants to work for a school.
dcchris 8 | 432  
3 Jul 2009 /  #11
Good advice Harry. Courtney, as far as your bf you know him better than any of these people here so don't worry. I like Warsaw but working is the way to go. Otherwise you are extremely isolated especially if you don't speak English. I don't have a certificate yet have a degree in Business Admin and feel that I have become a pretty good teacher. However, in the beginning I really didn't have a clue and I learned as I went. Other teachers are a great resource.
OP courtney0525 2 | 5  
4 Jul 2009 /  #12
I'm not sure when I will be moving.. My BF works for a company where he travels alot.. he may be taking only one more contract, so that he can open up his own business.. stay in Poland, and then flying me out. So I really do not know how much time I have left here in Canada.. Most likely I will have to take my course in Poland.. and most likely in Warsaw. As for funding for my course.. Im assuming he will pay for this, unless there is any kind of bursaries and/or grants I would be able to apply for.

Courtney, as far as your bf you know him better than any of these people here so don't worry

Thank you! I agree, and as far as failure in our relationship goes.. I guess time will tell. I am not going to worry about what others say because I believe that love is love and if its meant to be, it will be. If my life is destined to be in Poland, it will... if it end up being the opposite.. than I will at least of had the opportunity to live in Poland for a little while.

Other than working in Poland.. does anyone have any other advice for me about LIVING in poland. Things for me to look forward to, things I should be wary of?!

Also, Id like to thank everyone so far for replying to my thread.. much appreciated, thank you for taking the time to help me out! :)
MightyMieszko - | 1  
4 Jul 2009 /  #13
I am new here and was just browsing the forum, found this thread on the top page and thought I could answer as well. :)

I am a Pole from Montreal, lived most of my life here but I have family and GF! in Poland and so I do travel quite often and know both countries well.

Tips on daily life, eh?

- First is money and food right? Well, a usefull thing to remember when it comes to food & beverage price comparison is that the number on the price tag is roughly similar to what you find in Canada but of course in a different currency. In other words, when you are at the grocery or at the restaurant, think if you would pay that many canadian dollars for the product? If yes, then it is a good deal. If no, then you are getting ripped off. Of course, since the dollar stands about at 2,5 zlotys you might think all food is incredibly cheap, but don't get lured by that, look at the absolute number on the menu.

- Other consumption goods though might turn out just expensive as in Canada, particularly for brand clothing, cds, dvds, electronics. For clothing, stay away from malls, there are plenty of good bargains at side street shops. (though service may not be as good)

- If you are looking to get by in English when shopping alone then the big malls are the place to go. You'll find a lot of familiar international boutiques and stores and the staff is generally young and thus has a knowledge of English.

- Public transit is generaly reliable (though expect the unexpected!) and can get you anywhere for a small fare. But don't jump unprepared into the wild. Take your time to get a transit map, study the routes, schedules and ticket sales points (usually a small shack/convienance store called "Ruch" located nearby stops) prior to your first adventure.

- Pedestrian life.. unlike in Canada where we have simple streets with two slabs of sidewalk on each side, dowtown Warsaw is not like that. Many cars are parked in what seems a no mans land between the street and the sidewalk proper, there are a lot of unclear spots as to is that the street or a pedestrian walkway? Just keep eyes open, afer a couple of days, you'll understand the logic.

- Again, unlike in Canada, where we tend to cross a street whenever, wherever just because we don't see any car approaching, do not do it in Poland! For what seems like a hectic country, they are very anal about their street crossings. Everyone gently waits for the green even if there is no traffic and it is minus 20 outside. First, you'll look like a suicidal lunatic, second, the policeman on the corner might not like it and third, the frantic taxi that might suddenly appear won't slow down. He is in his holy right to drive through.. you're stuck in the middle of a large avenue?.. too bad, that is your loss!

- For entertainment, dowtown warsaw should provide all the necessary. There is no lack of parks, museums, pubs, restaurants, cafes, etc. And most of these places are used to tourists, even though that is not your case, so getting by in English should be fairly easy. Also, in each mall, you have a modern cineplex, so you can see all the new blockbusters in the original English version as well.

- Dunno if that is an important point but you can buy booze 24/7 at most gas stations!

- As for job interviews, dress very formal, be serious and no familiarity with your superiors. The professional relationships tend to follow stricter guidelines that what you might have had experienced so far here. Of course, that is just generally speaking, I'm sure there are exceptions.

Hmm... what else can i think of? I don't know, but I hope this has been somehow helpful. :)

Marcin
becska - | 6  
7 Jul 2009 /  #14
Wow, I didn't realize us Canadian women were such harda$$es. Court, trust your instincts, and heed the advise of the normal posts. I know that you and M will be very happy together. I luv ya's both!!
OP courtney0525 2 | 5  
7 Jul 2009 /  #15
hahaha and we love you! yes, ppl decided to taint my thread... i guess seeing as how im canadian, i may have to hurt them! JUST KIDDING!!!!!!!!!
terri 1 | 1,664  
7 Jul 2009 /  #16
A little bit of an aside, (sorry for intejecting on your thread) but...

>>A Trinity College Cert TESOL will do. In Poland you can do the CELTA in Warsaw (at ELS Bell), in Krakow (at International House).

...I know CELTA is more valued but do you need to have any certs (such as Trinity Tesol) before they accept you on a course? Also is the course 'doable' for someone with little teaching experience (except that necessary for Trin. Tesol)?
doktorowa_d - | 4  
20 Jul 2009 /  #17
hi Courtney,
teach English, but learn Polish, very nice people and really great school you can find at Mokotowska str, CJP, Warsaw see cjp.pl
tj123  
20 Jul 2009 /  #18
Don't stake your entire life on moving here because of some guy who let's face it may or may not be there for you in the future. People can tell you they "love" Poland all day long but the fact is a lot of stuff here is harder and frustrating. It will be 'new' and 'fun' for 6 months or so then the drag will start. You will get tired of a LOT here and you two will being to argue. The cultural differences everyone says don't matter if you are in love? They do. It is not impossible but for every person I know who did what you are doing and it worked...there were 20 who it failed miserably for.

Moral of my story? If YOU want to live in Poland and have an escape option try it...but don't give up options at home and do not rely on him to make things nice here...he cannot change the things you will hate. Odds are you won't even be talking to him in a year...it's not pessimism it's realism and statistics.

Good luck either way.
OP courtney0525 2 | 5  
21 Jul 2009 /  #19
thanks for the imput, but you dont know the relationship i am in, and you dont know either one of us... therefore, yes i know its possible that things may not work out, but it is my relationship and i feel as though it is going somewhere. if things dont work out, i can always come back to canada. as for him not being there for me, he is extremely there for me and loves to do anthing in his power to take care of me. i wil be happy if i am with him, end of story. if all else fails, i can come home. but as i said, thanks for your tips.
tj123  
21 Jul 2009 /  #20
thanks for the imput, but you dont know the relationship i am in, and you dont know either one of us.

That's what they all say. Your story is as old as time. You are already set up for failure because of this blind attitude you have. Oh well....I guess that is how we learn because it is sure not by listening to people with experience in life.
Woodson 1 | 9  
21 Jul 2009 /  #21
Courtney, GO FOR IT!!! Experience this situation, if it’s meant to be it will be. It’s always good to travel and live in other countries; it’s a great personal experience that changes and educates people. No one here can judge you on what kind of relationship you have with your boyfriend. My opinion is if you don’t to this, you will regret it in the future and regret is much more painful. One thing I can tell you is that some people on these boards are jealous and will give you negative advice or they will say things that are wrong just to keep you away from experiences in Poland. The best thing is to trust your own gut and follow your heart and do things on your own, which is the only way you will find the truth. Wish you all the best to both of you!
tj123  
21 Jul 2009 /  #22
You must have not done very much in life if you think "regret" is the most painful thing. People dont go into this stuff with their eyes open..they go in all **** and vinegar because of ******** romance like you are spouting off with and later they suffer for it.

Her comments show she is naive as hell especially about Polish men and the culture here. As long as she doesnt give up a good career or opportunities in Canada the worst she will suffer is a broken heart...but a lot of people risk more and it rarely works. Denial is strong here....
lowfunk99 10 | 397  
21 Jul 2009 /  #23
Don't work with out a permit.

I took CELTA and it was well worth it.

It would have been very had to teach English with out some kind of training. I took my CELTA at IH Wrocław and recommend it.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,454  
21 Jul 2009 /  #24
You and Harry epitomize Warsaw...annoying, self righteous dicks..

Unfortunately, I'm not from Warsaw and live about 300km from there ;)

The fact that you're spending so much time on here ranting and raving about Poland, combined with 'bitter experience about people losing a lot' sounds like someone was taken advantage of by one of those girls standing by the road from...Ukraine? ;)

Courtney - go for it, as the other person said. If you have common sense and don't act like Poland owes you a favour (unlike the bitter man here) - then you'll be fine. Just make sure that you double, triple check everything and that you understand fully what you're doing before you commit to anything, just as you'd do in Canada, then you'll be fine :)

And can we have a whip-round to get him his taxi fare to the airport?

Airport/nearest lake, certainly.

But I really don't understand..if you hate a country so much and everything about it, why stay? The door is there...

Courtney, the majority of people that you'll meet in Poland are fantastic people. But on occasion, you'll wander into a bar and hear someone moaning about everything. You'll hear English and your curiosity will be aroused, only to discover subsequently that the person is bitter, jaded and delusional - usually because of some woman that rejected him.

Stay well away from that type :)

The majority of expats are friendly, happy people though.

Please, try and keep to the original topic.
tj123  
21 Jul 2009 /  #25
The majority of expats are friendly, happy people though.

Haha...hehehehe...hoooooooooo....oh man....my side hurts....oh my god....stop it...really stop it.....hahahaha......

But on occasion, you'll wander into a bar and hear someone moaning about everything.

See there? I knew you had something you were not telling us. It all makes sense now....well I am sure you can find something in your EU manual that tells you how to handle that.
Woodson 1 | 9  
21 Jul 2009 /  #26
tj123 You must have not done very much in life if you think "regret" is the most painful thing.

Ummm... Where have I said that?
tj123  
21 Jul 2009 /  #27
My opinion is if you don’t to this, you will regret it in the future and regret is much more painful.

Right there...you say regret over not doing something is more painful than doing something and having it go bad...this is silly.
Woodson 1 | 9  
21 Jul 2009 /  #28
tj123 You must have not done very much in life if you think "regret" is the most painful thing.

Still don't see it buddy... where is the word "most" in that sentence...

Yes silly silly …. I have never said that regret is “most painful thing in life”,
becska - | 6  
27 Jul 2009 /  #29
tisk tisk... why is everyone fighting.. this is courtney on a friends account... and i just want to thank everyone for the POSITIVE comments.. and to be honest.. the negativity flies right on past me.. I know my relationship.. key word, MY RELATIONSHIP.. as everyone else knows their own more than I ever would. I have spoke with his mother and she cries at how happy he is with me. I am going to get my passport tomorrow, and will be in Poland for my first visit in about 3 weeks. Possibly staying for 3 months! I cannot wait, and ill be sure to post how well and happy I am to let all the friendly posters know!

Thanks again for all of the encouragement!! xoxox
-Courtney0525

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