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"Polish ambassador warns - think twice about coming to Britain for work "


RevokeNice 15 | 1,859  
24 Sep 2009 /  #91
justice has been done

No, no it has not. The pillage of my nation is still being carried out.

what goes around comes around.

Can we, the Irish taxpayer, have our couple of billion euro back so, pole? Tell me, what does the Irish nation owe to Poland?

sorry old boy

Who are you calling old boy?
BritishEmpire - | 148  
24 Sep 2009 /  #92
Settle down my good friend, please otherwise you will have a heart attack, its a level playing field now and in the best interest of Poland, no more foreigners in Poland.

I hope the foreigners come and rape your country in the same way that you parasites have done to others peoples, think of it as a taste of your own medicine!.

Then you will really see who benefits from mass immigration which is the companies and not the people.
bolek 6 | 330  
24 Sep 2009 /  #93
A touch of sour grapes..hey... get over it.
Harry  
24 Sep 2009 /  #94
Can we, the Irish taxpayer, have our couple of billion euro back so, pole?

Sure thing. But first pay back the tens of billions of Euro which the EU gave you.

I hope the foreigners come and rape your country in the same way that you parasites have done to others peoples, think of it as a taste of your own medicine!.

Got to love the irony of a Brit complaining about foreigners coming and raping his country!

One more thing: learn how basic punctuation works you idiot.
niejestemcapita 2 | 561  
24 Sep 2009 /  #95
its time poles woke up to the fact that brits or irish working in poland do nothing for POLAND.

its a level playing field now

in your tiny mind, obviously not.
The handful of British and Irish working in Poland are a tiny fraction of the MILLIONS of Poles who are just in UK or Ireland for financial gain, many of whom spend most of their time being bloody rude to and about the people here.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,475  
24 Sep 2009 /  #96
Sure thing. But first pay back the tens of billions of Euro which the EU gave you.

Shh, it's a sore point with many Irish that they were absolutely **** poor for the vast majority of their existence. In fact, it's quite ironic that an Irishman is complaining about Poles sucking money from his country when Ireland sucked money from others for most of their existence.
RevokeNice 15 | 1,859  
24 Sep 2009 /  #97
Really? It wouldnt have anything to do with an illegal occupation of their country now, would it? It wouldnt have anything to do with the British governments sponsored famine now, would it? It wouldnt have anything to do with the rape, pillage, and blunder of Ireland by crown forces now, would it?

As for Ireland owing the EUnuchs billions of euro, laughable. They were getting billions of euro of our fish stocks the entire time, paying some of us not to develop or exploit our own natural resources while pretty much wiping those resources out. They were bribing us to do nothing, to keep what should have been a major part of our island economy completely stagnant and undeveloped so they could plunder it.

Now, Harry, explain to me why the Irish taxpayer should subsidise, house, feed, and clothe, Polish citizens. Over 50,000 of them.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,475  
24 Sep 2009 /  #98
Dunno, maybe you should tell us why the EEC/EC/EU subsidised nearly 4 million Irish (plus the ones in NI) for so long?
RevokeNice 15 | 1,859  
24 Sep 2009 /  #99
What did the EUnuchs get in return?
BritishEmpire - | 148  
24 Sep 2009 /  #100
A touch of sour grapes..hey... get over it.

Keep up the double standards pal because we all know that they're coming to your place :D

Got to love the irony of a Brit complaining about foreigners coming and raping his country!

Maybe you would like to get things right in future by saying that you love brits complaining about pawel and his mates raping others countries including the UK, mine isn't the only country that has been affected.

One thing you should learn about punctuation and me idiot which is at silly o'clock in the morning i really couldn't give a fugg!
RevokeNice 15 | 1,859  
24 Sep 2009 /  #101
Shh, it's a sore point with many Irish that they were absolutely **** poor for the vast majority of their existence.

It is not a sore point, it is the truth. I am not offended by the truth.

In fact, it's quite ironic that an Irishman is complaining about Poles sucking money from his country when Ireland sucked money from others for most of their existence.

Your understanding of economic is nearly as poor as your grasp on History.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,475  
24 Sep 2009 /  #102
What did the EUnuchs get in return?

As you say, the fishing rights. I don't deny this - it's well known that the only reason Ireland was admitted was for access to the fishing stocks. But you did benefit vastly from it - Microsoft, Dell, et al wouldn't have gone near an Ireland that wasn't in the EC at the time. And of course, you benefitted from things such as the CAP - what benefit did British taxpayers get from subsidising Irish farmers?

Of course, ultimately, the people decide. The Lisbon Referendum will show all - but I get the distinct feeling that with neutrality and abortion rights reserved to Ireland, the Irish people will drop their opposition to Lisbon...
RevokeNice 15 | 1,859  
24 Sep 2009 /  #103
You get a distinct feeling that the Irish will ratify the Lisbon treaty, all the way from your English language school in Poland. You are a remarkable woman, I will give you that.

You wouldnt be assuming things again, would you, delphiandomine?

And of course, you benefitted from things such as the CAP - what benefit did British taxpayers get from subsidising Irish farmers?

No, only the farmers did. Not the other 95% of the population.

Microsoft, Dell, et al wouldn't have gone near an Ireland that wasn't in the EC at the time.

Are you sure, do you know Gates or Dell personally? They came because we had a highly educated English speaking workforce and because of our low corporate taxes. Neither of which, had anything to do with the EUnuchs.

As you say, the fishing rights.

And access to our gas. So you accept that we didnt get "free money". Great. But of course, in a month or so, you will bring it up again and we will have to dance this dance, once again.
Harry  
24 Sep 2009 /  #104
Now, Harry, explain to me why the Irish taxpayer should subsidise, house, feed, and clothe, Polish citizens. Over 50,000 of them.

Largely because the Irish taxpayer has benefited to the tune of £32,000,000,000 in EU funds since Ireland joined the EU. And also because Irish citizens have exactly the same right to come to Poland and be subsidised, housed, fed, and clothed by the Polish taxpayer.

Maybe you would like to get things right in future by saying that you love brits complaining about pawel and his mates raping others countries including the UK, mine isn't the only country that has been affected.

Coming from a person whose country raped its way across more than a quarter of the planet, enslaving people as it went, that's pretty fecking funny!
RevokeNice 15 | 1,859  
24 Sep 2009 /  #105
And also because Irish citizens have exactly the same right to come to Poland and be subsidised, housed, fed, and clothed by the Polish taxpayer.

Back that up please.
Harry  
24 Sep 2009 /  #106
Happily. You need to look at Regulation (EEC) No 1408/71 of the Council of 14 June 1971 on the application of social security schemes to employed persons and their families moving within the Community. "Matters covered

The Regulation applies to all legislation relating to the social security branches concerning sickness and maternity benefits, invalidity benefits, old age benefits, survivors' benefits, benefits in respect of accidents at work and occupational diseases, unemployment benefits, family benefits and death grants. It applies to general and special contributory and non-contributory social security schemes and to schemes concerning the liability of an employer or shipowner." Details here.

europa.eu/legislation_summaries/employment_and_social_policy/social_protection/c10516_en.htm]

As regards Polish implimentation of this policy: "The Union coordination of social security systems for persons migrating within the Community (Regulations 1408/71 and 574/72) will be applied from the day of Polands accession to the EU. In consequence, employees in Poland will not lose any contributions and will be covered by the Polish social security system. Periods of social security coverage and employment in any EU country will be taken into account in calculating the size of pensions and unemployment benefits. Unemployment benefits will be granted in accordance with domestic law; in the case of Poland that refers to the law of December 14 1994 on employment and prevention of unemployment (Journal of Laws of 2003, No.58, item 514 with subsequent amendments)." From here.

mswia.gov.pl/wai/en/1/86/ADVISORY_FOR_CITIZENS_OF_THE_EUROPEAN_UNION_TRAVELLING_TO_POLAND_AFTER_MAY_1_200.html#SOCIAL

I notice that you have not a word to say about the £32 billion net which Ireland has received from the EU.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,475  
24 Sep 2009 /  #107
You get a distinct feeling that the Irish will ratify the Lisbon treaty, all the way from your English language school in Poland.

Considering the 'No' campaign is full of 'can't be bothered' types lke yourself, is it any surprise that the referendum should pass? After all, it does amaze me that someone so passionately against the EU can't even be bothered to stand in Grafton Street for a few hours...

Who said anything about me being female, or indeed having anything to do with English teaching? Indeed, you don't even know what nationality I am...

No, only the farmers did. Not the other 95% of the population.

Funnily enough, the same 95% of the population has consistently voted in pro-EU parties. You've had plenty of chances since 1973 to leave the Union, so why haven't you, if you're so utterly against it as a nation?

Neither of which, had anything to do with the EUnuchs.

Also to do with the ease of access to the European market. An Ireland located outside of the EEC wouldn't have nearly been as attractive to multinationals - after all, why did the same companies ignore Cyprus and Malta, both of which have a considerable English speaking workforce? That's right - they were outside the EU and thus not as attractive.

But of course, in a month or so, you will bring it up again and we will have to dance this dance, once again.

And taxes were paid to fuel the Celtic Tiger, or have you forgotten this too? Of course, if you wish to claim that the EU stole your gas, that's fine - but funnily enough, the UK managed to profit just fine from it.

I notice that you have not a word to say about the £32 billion net which Ireland has received from the EU.

Nor has he anything to say about the masses of Irish that claimed British unemployment benefits in the past.
RevokeNice 15 | 1,859  
24 Sep 2009 /  #108
I notice that you have not a word to say about the £32 billion net which Ireland has received from the EU.

See post 137.

Your link was not very clear. How long would Irish citizens have to reside in Poland before qualifying for said benefits? How many Irish are on said benefits, if any at all?

I can tell you this,there are 50,000 Poles on benefits here. Coosting us anything from 530,000,000(minimum) to 1,000,000,000(maximum) per annum. Once again, you immigration fanitics are not comparing like for like.

Before you start with the usual response, "they paid taxes, they are entitled to benefits", they did not pay taxes. According to several articles in the Irish Times, as much as 38% of workers were entirely out of the (P.A.Y.E.) tax net. Of course, low paid foreigners would have contributed a significant proportion of this cohort. In fact, most foreigners working here were probably not obliged to pay P.A.Y.E. tax and thus not income taxpayers.

Dole should be cut across the board, Irish and foreigners, alike.

After all, it does amaze me that someone so passionately against the EU can't even be bothered to stand in Grafton Street for a few hours...

Libertas are not involved. I am not standing around with the great unwashed from SF, COIR, or the marxists. The majority of people have made their minds up. LIEsbon will be rejected. I am more concerned about SCAMA, to be honest.

Indeed, you don't even know what nationality I am...

Scottish.

You've had plenty of chances since 1973 to leave the Union

When did I claim that the majority of Irish citizens wanted to leave the EU? Since the turn of the century, more people voted against European treaties than for them.

why did the same companies ignore Cyprus and Malta, both of which have a considerable English speaking workforce?

Again, you are assuming. Our education system wipes the floor with Malta and Cyprus.

And taxes were paid to fuel the Celtic Tiger, or have you forgotten this too?

I didnt claim they stole it. I claimed it was part of the deal. We get grants(bribes), they get access to our natural resources.

Nor has he anything to say about the masses of Irish that claimed British unemployment benefits in the past.

There are tens of thousands of UK nationals in reciept of welfare in Ireland too. I cannot complain as you rightfully point out, Irish did the same in the past. Our welfare rates are three times that of the UK. It is reciprocal, unlike the situation with eastern europeans.
OsiedleRuda  
24 Sep 2009 /  #109
Add on to that the child benefits, rent allowance, education, english classes, medical cards yadda yadda, you get the picture.

Don't forget those lucrative interpreter fees ;)

its a level playing field now and in the best interest of Poland, no more foreigners in Poland.

Who is this fool? What "level playing field"?

Oh, that "level" playing field where Poles can move where they like to work/live, but Poland remains the exclusive domain of Polish-born people? lol. Poles moving to the UK get WAY more rights than a Briton would get if they moved to Poland, and you know it.

Every EU worker now has an equal right to apply for virtually any UK job they wish, on equal terms - whereas in Poland, you still advertise many jobs as being for women-only or women preferred (which I'm sure breaks some EU law or other) so don't tell me about how allegedly unequal things are for the average Polish immigrant over here!!

Sorry to rattle your cage, but in fact the UK and Ireland owe Poland nothing. And unlike some of the "Poles go home" crowd on here and elsewhere, I'm not biased - I'm of 100% Polish origin - but what you are talking about is b***ocks and you know it.
RevokeNice 15 | 1,859  
24 Sep 2009 /  #110
Don't forget those lucrative interpreter fees ;)

How could I forget, I suppose I should throw the 150 million euro per annum spent teaching eastern european kids English into the mix too. For a small nation of 3.5 million citizens, we are a generous bunch.
bolek 6 | 330  
25 Sep 2009 /  #111
Who is this fool?

Listen dude do your home work before posting such nonsense, can I suggest you study US foreign policy in relation to immigration, the US believe that immigration must be of benefit to its country. Poles must also do the same.
MareGaea 29 | 2,752  
25 Sep 2009 /  #112
benefit to its country

That's why the first years after 10 May 2004 all countries except Ireland, the UK and Sweden, closed their borders for Poles.

But besides this, I think Poland owes it to the rest of Europe to accept foreigners to come live and work within its borders. Simply because of the millions of Poles that flocked out across the continent in the past 5 years. What goes around, comes around, my friend.

M-G (listens to Sam Cooke and is always thankful for musical threads. Wanted to start a new one himself, but Lodz the boat beat him to it)
RevokeNice 15 | 1,859  
25 Sep 2009 /  #113
the US believe that immigration must be of benefit to its country. Poles must also do the same.

I am sure they were referring to legal immigrants. You do realise that to work legally in the US of A you need a green card? To qualify for a green card you need have skills that the US of A needs.

Now, compare that to the open border lunacy we have in the EU. A convicted criminal can breeze through Irish border controls without a care in the world, which regularly occurs. Look at the Costa del Sol, it is a magnet for drug lords and convicted criminals.

We get coffee makers, toilet cleaners, shelf stackers, burger flippers and child minders whilst the US of A gets the creme la creme.
MareGaea 29 | 2,752  
25 Sep 2009 /  #114
Ehm, I am sure you are not talking about ppl like me and many other Westerners, right?

Oh btw: I read today (and I have heard many Irish friends say it as well) that the outcome of the Referendum next week Friday will be a 90% yes, my good man. How about that?

M-G (makes a decent coffee, but is no coffee maker)
RevokeNice 15 | 1,859  
25 Sep 2009 /  #115
You know what I meant, the vast majority of menial jobs are being undertaken by slavs and assorted third worlders. You very rarely meet a western european in menial employment in Ireland for the except for the twenty something year old who is here for a working p*ss up for a year.

As for Lisbon, it will not pass. Put a twenty on it. How can the media predict a referendum, they wouldnt have a pro european agenda now, would they?

I read in An Phoblact that we will have a United Ireland by 2020, it doesnt make it true.

Anyways: A new opinion poll shows that there has been a massive surge in support for the No side, which, if it holds till voting day would result in the Lisbon Treaty being heavily defeated by a margin of 59% NO 'V' 41% YES.

blogs.libertas.eu/ireland/
MareGaea 29 | 2,752  
25 Sep 2009 /  #116
You're right on that part.

About Lisbon:

With An Phoblact you name just about the most extreme nationalist Irish newspaper, and as I always think with AP (if I can read it, it's in Gaelic) most of it is wishful thinking. A United Ireland, don't think that will happen in our lifetime.

And as far as the opinion poll goes: it just depends on who you're asking: I have been asking around this week among my Irish friends and if that would be an opinion poll, then the outcome would be 70% Yes and 30% No. What I am trying to say is that you never can rely too much on polls. We will see what happens next Friday. But to be honest, I have done some reading up on the Treaty and I must say it's not even that bad a treaty. All the things you fear it is, I can't find them, simply enough. Actually, did you know that with the Treaty, everybody, except Bulgaria and Romania gets the right to veto? Europe will definitively not take over Ireland. In fact, more power will be diverted to the respective governments. And: abortion will NOT be enforced upon Ireland. It says nowhere that it will, and if I have to believe those demonstators in front of the GPO a few weeks ago, the first thing that will happen with Lisbon is that Ireland will have to allow abortion. This is simply not true. I invite you to read through the Treaty once again and you will see that it's not that bad at all. Mind you, I am not trying to influence you or propagating to vot Yes, that's your own choice, I just would like you to see the positive things in the Treaty. That's all.

Edit: if the Treaty would mean that national integrity is at stake, how come the British already have agreed to that? The British are usually the first to reject anything that infringes their national integrity. Think about it.

M-G (goes to bed soon)
RevokeNice 15 | 1,859  
25 Sep 2009 /  #117
and as I always think with AP (if I can read it, it's in Gaelic) most of it is wishful thinking.

I am fluent, it is a Sinn Fein rag. I read it for the comedy gold, a light relief in all the doom and gloom.

This means that Ireland will become a magnet for illegals from the third world and many illegals resident in the UK will come here.

Article 15, Charter of Fundamental Rights
Freedom to choose an occupation and right to engage in work

1. Everyone has the right to engage in work and to pursue a freely chosen or accepted occupation.

I could go on, but Ive a pain in me hoop with LIEsbon.
MareGaea 29 | 2,752  
25 Sep 2009 /  #118
Hey, but that charter is already the case within the EU. It only counts for EU citizens though. Not for 3rd World citizens. In fact, the Treaty comprises also of a better border control, so if some Eastern European country has scr*wed up before by letting those immigrants in, they won't be able to do so in the future. And that is just what you want, do you?

M-G (good night)
RevokeNice 15 | 1,859  
25 Sep 2009 /  #119
In fact the Treaty comprises also of a better border control

Show where it states this in the treaty.

Hey, but that charter is already the case within the EU. It only counts for EU citizen though. Not for 3rd World citizen

That is a matter for the ECJ, not the Irish supreme court. Do you trust them, i dont.

good night

Goodnight, I am off to Prague tomorrow, never fear, I will return in time to vote No. No to LIEsbon. No to FF the mass immigration party. No to the EUnuchs.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,475  
25 Sep 2009 /  #120
Show where it states this in the treaty.

Take a trip to the Eastern border and look for yourself. There's big ugly fences on the Polish-Belarussian frontier, the green border between Ukraine and Poland is heavily monitored too. Controls at the Eastern Border are thorough as hell - and possibly the only place in the EU where they're worse than UK immigration in terms of being absolutely thorough and pedantic, even to EU citizens.

By the way, a question - ignoring all the hypothetical one-Ireland stuff and going on current realities, how would you defend the Irish border?

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