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Poles learning from the British?


cyg 5 | 119  
29 May 2008 /  #1
Though probably not what they should be learning:

The Full Monty

nwe (May 29, 2008)

Officers operating Warsaw's video monitoring system got an eyeful early on Sunday morning when they saw four young men walking naked down a street in Bielany
nwe.pl/National.php?article_id=484

Now I've never seen Poles behaving this way before, and certainly have seen my share of otherwise respectable Brits cherish showing their behinds in public. I wonder where these gents got the idea? Wouldn't be too surprised if they had UK stamps in their passports.
Matyjasz 2 | 1,544  
29 May 2008 /  #2
O temporas! O mores!

What's next? A sign on those fruit tea's saying "do not add milk"? Damn you Britain! ;)
osiol 55 | 3,922  
29 May 2008 /  #3
Builders, plummers and the like are all supposed to reveal some arse as part of their job. Polish people come here to do some of these jobs, so they are expected to do these jobs properly.

A sign on those fruit tea's saying "do not add milk"?

What? You put milk in fruit tea?
Matyjasz 2 | 1,544  
29 May 2008 /  #4
Oh God forbid! I don't even add milk to a regular tea. We used to confuse the ladies at the canteen ordering fast one tea with sugar without milk and one coffee with milk without sugar. :)

As for the fruit tea, when I bought one at Sainsbury's there was a sign on it saying "Do not add milk". I found it pretty funny that you need to be remembered that fruit tea and milk just don't "add up". :)
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
29 May 2008 /  #5
Tea with milk, what a daft idea!! Coffee with milk and tea on its own, that's the way.
VaFunkoolo 6 | 654  
29 May 2008 /  #6
what a sweeping generalisation and showing limited knowledge of how tea and coffee should be drunk
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
29 May 2008 /  #7
Just giving my opinion lad, u know where ur logout button is. How is it that the greater part of Asia, if not the whole of it, drink tea without milk? Go to a sushi bar in Japan with the conveyor belt and ask for milk with ur tea and see how far it gets u.
VaFunkoolo 6 | 654  
29 May 2008 /  #8
Of course youre entitled to give your opinion Sunny Jim, but as you have no doubt been told before, being entitled to an opinion doesnt make it right.

Now, as anyone who knows anything about tea drinking will tell you, there are some teas that should be drunk with milk and some that shouldn't. Making sweeping generalisations one way or the other is just plain wrong.

Thank you for pointing out where the logout button is. I suggest if you don't like people commenting on your posts you use it yourself.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
29 May 2008 /  #9
Hehehe, I have better things to do with my time than be a tea connoiseur. Sunny Jim, LOL, that was what my grandad used to call me. I believe u, other wouldn't
VaFunkoolo 6 | 654  
29 May 2008 /  #10
I am a coffee drinker, which can be drunk with or without milk in most countries of the world without people making sweeping generalisations about etiquette.

Fortunately :)
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
29 May 2008 /  #11
Hahaha, u took the bait. I've seen how coffee is drunk in many countries so I have some awareness of the etiquette behind it. I was just winding u up.

My personal viewpoint is that the cheaper teas should be drunk with milk. I wouldn't dream of putting milk in o-cha but each to their own.
z_darius 14 | 3,968  
29 May 2008 /  #12
My personal viewpoint is that the cheaper teas should be drunk with milk.

Why drink cheap tea, instead of decent kind, and then increase the cost anyway by adding milk to it?
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
29 May 2008 /  #13
I'm not advocating the drinking of cheap tea. Many Brits drink cheap tea with milk and it seems to go down well. I guess it is for the tannins, the nice effect they give. I prefer the taste of good tea
VaFunkoolo 6 | 654  
29 May 2008 /  #14
I am delighted that I have given you the satisfaction of falling for your little ploy and pleased for you that you are able to find amusement in such trivial matters.

Allowing you to continue your tea drinking education this is a basic guide for which should be drunk with or without:

Assam India with or without
Ceylon Uva with or without
Ceylon Dimbula with or without

Kenyan with

The rest, including Oolong, Lapsang Souchong and Darjeeling should be drunk without
z_darius 14 | 3,968  
29 May 2008 /  #15
OK, you'rew my kind of guy then. We should get together for a cup of good tea sometime. A beer or 10 wouldn't hurt either, although the danger is that after a few even sheep start looking good.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
29 May 2008 /  #16
And Earl Grey? For me without
z_darius 14 | 3,968  
29 May 2008 /  #17
One of the two kinds I drink. That and green tea.
I'll have an EG now!
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
29 May 2008 /  #18
Earl Grey and green tea, a man of class. Dilmah is also a good brand. My landlord got me into that. It's Sri-Lankan I think
osiol 55 | 3,922  
29 May 2008 /  #19
No-one mentioned the fruit tea with milk. Now, as far as I'm concerned, that is just plain wrong.

Oolong - great word!
telefonitika  
29 May 2008 /  #20
Wouldn't be too surprised if they had UK stamps in their passports.

EU members dont get their passports stamped :)

You put milk in fruit tea?

ewwwwww not even i add milk in fruit tea ...
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
29 May 2008 /  #21
EU members CAN get their passports stamped, if u want to prove that u have been in a country for 'x' number of time. I had to do this last year.
telefonitika  
29 May 2008 /  #22
well consider my hand slapped then ..... as thats a new one on me!
ogorek - | 165  
29 May 2008 /  #23
Poles learning from the British?

Please dont.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
30 May 2008 /  #24
Please don't. There u go, u just learned where to put an apostrophe from me, a Brit ;) There's so much we can teach you.
Matyjasz 2 | 1,544  
30 May 2008 /  #25
Now, as anyone who knows anything about tea drinking will tell you, there are some teas that should be drunk with milk and some that shouldn't. Making sweeping generalisations one way or the other is just plain wrong.

The mere statement that there are some teas that should be drunk with milk for me is just an vivid example of those plain wrong generalizations.

Personally I don't find tea with milk disgusting, but I also don't find is so tasteful that I would actually do it. As with everything it gets down to personal preferences and them bloody taste buds. :)

I'm not advocating the drinking of cheap tea. Many Brits drink cheap tea with milk and it seems to go down well. I guess it is for the tannins, the nice effect they give. I prefer the taste of good tea

Here in Poland we drink cheap tea with lemon or with home made raspberry juice...mmmmm :) (but I'm sure you actually know it)
VaFunkoolo 6 | 654  
30 May 2008 /  #26
True Matyjasz. But we should conceed to those who have superior knowledge than us. Or is that too gross a generalisation for you?
Matyjasz 2 | 1,544  
30 May 2008 /  #27
Yes, it is too gross generalization for moi. The wonderful world of food is very subjective. I can't imagine some experts telling me what should taste me and what not. I would leave those problems to food purists. Isn't there a saying that "Food purism is worse than fascism!"? ;)

But than again that could just be my polish anarchistic nature. ;)
VaFunkoolo 6 | 654  
30 May 2008 /  #28
You're right. I don't like it when Poles tell me what I should or shouldn't mix my vodka with but at the same time I do give credence to their superior knowledge.

Afterall, the Polish stereotype is one of a vodka swilling expert, just as the British stereotype is of tea sipping expertise. So it would be a little presumptious of me, a Brit, trying to tell a Pole how to drink vodka.
ogorek - | 165  
30 May 2008 /  #29
The Poles invented Wodka so they know how it should be experienced. The Brits nicked tea from India and ruin it by putting milk in it. Innit!

Please don't. There u go, u just learned where to put an apostrophe from me, a Brit ;) There's so much we can teach you.

As a Brit living in Britain - I spoke out in protest to the way this country is going (down the shitter) and me thinks lessons can be gained by looking at others who are not on that same precipice - and maybe, just maybe it's the other way round. Looking through history - Britain - it's language and structure is shaped/influenced by the Romans, Germans, the French and even the Poles. Reasons why you are not a Muslim, you have a written constitution, you are not Teutonic, you know the Sun does not actully orbit the Earth, you had the Enigma code, Radium, Wodka(wehey), the greatest Pope ever, the end of communism in Europe yada,yada.

...and whats this i hear!!! No apostrophe??!!! Shame on me. i stand enlightened!. i shall flagellate myself till floweth mine crimsom blode. Innit!

Its only a forum mate - not Oxford bleedin university.
Chill! (thats another thing the Poles taught me)
VaFunkoolo 6 | 654  
30 May 2008 /  #30
The Poles invented Wodka so they know how it should be experienced. The Brits nicked tea from India and ruin it by putting milk in it. Innit!

Whilst the Brits undeniably took tea from India and introduce it to the civilised world I think there will be lively debate about where wodka actually originated. Innit!

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