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Doing laundry in Poland


shopgirl 6 | 928  
17 Jun 2007 /  #1
OK, I know...silly little topic, but everyone has to do laundry, and I have a few questions about how its done in Poland.

Last year my Polish friend and I were planning to prepare food for a gathering of friends. But first, he needed to do his laundry, register for classes on-line, go shopping for ingredients, etc. It was going to put "cooking" into a time crunch. So I suggested that he do the laundry at my place, use my computer to register at university, we would shop for food, and I could start the prep work.

So he puts the clothes in the washer and gets on the computer. A while later he comes downstairs and wants to know if the numbers on the washer's dial are for "wash time".

I said "yes, why?" He starts laughing and says its not possible to clean clothes well in 18 or 22 minutes. I said "really? How long does the wash cycle run in Poland?" He smiles and says "one hour!". I said "isn't that hard on the clothes...it will wear them out faster!" He shrugs and smiles.

Was he joking? Doesn't that mean much longer time to complete the laundry? I have done about 8 eight loads this weekend, and I can't imagine waiting that long.

Also, is fabric softener used? Or is it considered artificial?

Excuse me, the washer here has just stopped :)
bunia 1 | 134  
17 Jun 2007 /  #2
He smiles and says "one hour!".

or maybe he is just a man :)
Wroclaw 44 | 5,387  
17 Jun 2007 /  #3
We program the machine for each wash. Some wash cycles are longer than others.

18-20 minutes sounds very,very fast to me.
BubbaWoo 33 | 3,510  
17 Jun 2007 /  #4
everything takes longer in poland
bunia 1 | 134  
17 Jun 2007 /  #5
its not possible to clean clothes well in 18 or 22 minutes

honestly depends on the washing machine.
My grandmother has very antient washing machine and it takes almost 2 hours to finish cycle.
OP shopgirl 6 | 928  
17 Jun 2007 /  #6
it takes almost 2 hours to finish cycle.

Is there just one setting? Holy cow! :)

Do people hang laundry outside on a line to dry (to save money on electricity), or will the clothes be stolen?
Lady in red  
17 Jun 2007 /  #7
We program the machine for each wash. Some wash cycles are longer than others.18-20 minutes sounds very,very fast to me.

Same here and I'm in the UK. I think the shortest wash on my Miele Washing machine is 30 minutes for a handwash programme. All other washes are at least an hour.

It does sound very fast, shopgirl, I must admit.
OP shopgirl 6 | 928  
17 Jun 2007 /  #8
That's how they all are in the US :) Some only go to fifteen minutes. But we have strong detergents, too...they can strip the color right out of the clothing. Now it has become popular to market "fade resistant" detergents that claim to keep colors from fading out. There is even one such for "darks" so your favorite "little black dress" won't go gray! :)
PolskaDoll 28 | 2,105  
17 Jun 2007 /  #9
18-20 minutes sounds like a major advance in technology! My machine is only 2 years old and takes 1hr 45 for a normal 40 degree wash! I've never thought that this was a problem though! :)
Ranj 21 | 948  
17 Jun 2007 /  #10
My washer has settings for 15 minutes on a regular wash, although that is just for the wash cycle, it does not include the rinse and spin cycles which add another 15-20 minutes.
bunia 1 | 134  
17 Jun 2007 /  #11
definatelly outside :) It smells lovely and fresh ^^ It has nothing to do with saving money - just a habit i got after my mother :)

Is there just one setting? Holy cow! :)

there are 3 (90C, 60C and 30C) all three around 2 hours :) Told you its ancient washing machine:)
One at my parents house is more modern :) How long it takes ? Never actually though about it. I just put it on and forget about it untill i go there again and its done :) Actually same is with mine here - no timing just ABCDE thingy with teperature. No clue how long it takes :)
OP shopgirl 6 | 928  
17 Jun 2007 /  #12
When I lived in the country we always hung the laundry outside.
There's nothing like running outside on a frosty Autumn morning to pull a frozen pair of your fave jeans off the line! :)

Here in AZ I couldn't do that because of all the dust blowing around. They would have to be washed again! :)
Lady in red  
17 Jun 2007 /  #13
I'm wondering what else is different in the US , apart from the washing machines.

Life at a fast pace <joke>
PolskaDoll 28 | 2,105  
17 Jun 2007 /  #14
Love the smell of laundry dried in the fresh air! You cannot beat it, even with artificial things to put in the drier! Give me fresh air any day! :)
Ranj 21 | 948  
17 Jun 2007 /  #15
there are 3 (90C, 60C and 30C)

That is different than the US....couldn't understand when BW asked me if I washed his clothes in 40 degrees....huh? We have settings that say, hot, warm and cold. LOL
bunia 1 | 134  
17 Jun 2007 /  #16
hehe one of first things you learn about laundry is what goes on what temperature :) What will loose color and what will not :) What will shrink and what will not :)

At least that lesson i got from my mother when i was little :)
OP shopgirl 6 | 928  
17 Jun 2007 /  #17
Its the little differences that I like to learn. :)

I think our pace is not just "fast", I would call it "frenetic" and insane.

You need conveniences to stay in the game: short wash cycles, prepackaged foods, email, cell phones, etc.

Do you know that many families have giant bullentin boards in the kitchen area with all the kids scheduled events on it: soccer games, ballet practice, tutoring, Girl/Boy scout meetings, PTA meetings, dentist appointments, parent/teacher conferences, birthday parties.

I have ONE child, and sometimes I feel like I am drowning....trying to keep up with everything, and she isn't involved in very much at all (just Girl Scouts) :P

I have simplified as much as possible...its just not worth it to make yourself crazy!
bunia 1 | 134  
17 Jun 2007 /  #18
You need conveniences to stay in the game: prepackaged foods

What about healthy food ? And actually food that has a good taste and is not plastic ?
OP shopgirl 6 | 928  
17 Jun 2007 /  #19
You cannot beat it, even with artificial things to put in the drier! Give me fresh air any day! :)

Now we also have special designer scents for fabric softeners: Lavender and Vanilla, Tropical Breeze (what does that smell like?), etc.

We also use a lot of air freshener/disinfectant sprays. Oust is really popular for air. Febreeze is good for fabrics, carpets, car seats, closets.

What about Poland?

What about healthy food ? And actually food that has a good taste and is not plastic ?

You do what you can (but you can get prepared healthy food to go at deli sections of supermarkets-green salads, veggie trays, fruit salads, roasted chicken, etc.).

It was easier before the divorce...I had some help.
Lady in red  
17 Jun 2007 /  #20
Now we also have special designer scents for fabric softeners: Lavender and Vanilla, Tropical Breeze (what does that smell like?), etc. We also use a lot of air freshener/disinfectant sprays. Oust is really popular for air. Febreeze is good for fabrics, carpets, car seats, closets.

So many chemicals........ I wouldn't give that lot house room.
Meg 1 | 38  
17 Jun 2007 /  #21
I think the big difference in wash times comes about mostly because in the U.S. and Canada, the big majority of washing machines are "top loading" and have an agitator in the center of the tub. This allows the wash to be done much more quickly than in a "European-style" "front loading" machine, but it also uses a bit more electricity and a lot more water . . . :^( Front loading or "European" machines are starting to gain popularity, but they are often twice as much or more than our "regular" machines here - the prices are coming down, though, as domestic manufacturers start making them.

And you'd better have a matching big dryer because we also have (IMO) very idiotic bylaws in many cities and towns in the States that you cannot hang washing out behind your house, because it looks "poor" and "trashy" (these were often passed in the 1950s and '60's). Some of these are starting to be challenged now. But a whole generation (or two?) has grown up not knowing how to hang out laundry - I certainly don't, and wish I did . . .
bunia 1 | 134  
17 Jun 2007 /  #22
It was easier before the divorce...I had some help.

i didnt want to offend you in any way or say that you are doing wrong.
Just i dont like this whole artificial food culture :)
Shawn_H  
17 Jun 2007 /  #23
In our stay's in PL, visiting friends and family, one always had to check to see that there was no laundry hanging in the bath tub before getting into the shower. Minor inconvenience, but I am sure it saves on: Space (no dryer to house in a small apartment), money (cost of dryer, cost of power to run it), and clothes (less wear and tear than if it was cycled in the dryer).
bunia 1 | 134  
17 Jun 2007 /  #24
But a whole generation (or two?) has grown up not knowing how to hang out laundry - I certainly don't, and wish I did . . .

eeer you just put it on a string and clip edges so it doesnt fall :)
OP shopgirl 6 | 928  
17 Jun 2007 /  #25
you cannot hang washing out behind your house, because it looks "poor" and "trashy"

That sounds like something a "home owners association" would say. At one point my parents live in a neighborhood that regulated what kind of mailbox you had by the street and what kind of flowers you could plant around it!
krysia 23 | 3,058  
17 Jun 2007 /  #26
My machine also takes 15-20 minutes. Then off to the drier they go. No chemicals are needed only fabric softener which is good for the clothes. When clothes come out of the dryer they are softer and usually you don't have to iron them unless it's some bad material that wrinkles easy. But when you hang them specially over the tub, they become stiff and don't smell nice and are wrinkled plus you waste more time hanging them up and taking them off the clotheline.
OP shopgirl 6 | 928  
17 Jun 2007 /  #27
But now I'm worried that maybe my laundry isn't clean! Maybe I should run it twice!
Eurola 4 | 1,906  
17 Jun 2007 /  #28
What about healthy food ? And actually food that has a good taste and is not plastic ?

There is plenty of organic fruit, vegetables and meat in the stores, if that's your fancy. It is more expensive, but to me worth every penny. I mostly cook for myself but I have some frozen, organic dishes for "emergency" lunches, when I don't feel like making anything or I'm too busy to spent time in the kitchen. They are very good. Most of my shopping is done at Trader Joe's (also Polish delis) and I'm lucky I got one close by. I buy conventionally grown food as well. However, I stay away from food in cans or processed foods...

I find the food in The US very tasty. Restaurants (not fast food ones) are pretty inexpensive and most serve wonderful, wholesome food.
I bought two bunches of fresh mint (among other goodies) and I made a jar of "my own" mint tea today. I love it cold from the fridge. It's my favorite summer drink.

One of my friends makes a trip to Wisconsin occasionally and gets a "half a cow" or so from a farmer they know, to keep in the freezer for her carnivorous husband, who wants to eat 'grass fed' beef only...

There are plenty of good choices, it just involves more time. The conventional food can not be that bad...my neighbor is 87 or 88 years old, healthy, sharp minded and her favorite food is a can of soup. :)
Daisy 3 | 1,227  
18 Jun 2007 /  #29
Quoting: shopgirl
Now we also have special designer scents for fabric softeners: Lavender and Vanilla, Tropical Breeze (what does that smell like?), etc. We also use a lot of air freshener/disinfectant sprays. Oust is really popular for air. Febreeze is good for fabrics, carpets, car seats, closets.

So many chemicals........ I wouldn't give that lot house room.

you don't have to use chemicals. white wine vinegar makes a good fabric conditioner, you can add essential oils, eucalyptus oil in bedding will deter dust mites. You can freshen carpets by putting essential oils in bicarbonate of soda and sprinkle it on the carpet, leave for a while then vacuum, smells more natural as well.
OP shopgirl 6 | 928  
18 Jun 2007 /  #30
eucalyptus oil

Mmmmm, sounds nice. Will it stain dark colors?

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