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Do Polish people tend to stick together?


Doba 1 | 73  
9 Jan 2008 /  #1
I've noticed through out my life that Polacks tend to stay with their own kind more than others, not counting Muslims and **** like that :D

Most of my friends are Italian but didn’t necessarily end up with an Italian woman, even though I’m sure its common for Italians to stick with their own, maybe not so much as Polish people do, what do you guys think?

Are you strictly looking for a Polish mate or open to ideas?
BubbaWoo 33 | 3,506  
9 Jan 2008 /  #2
do poles stick together more than other nationalities - im not so sure they do. just look at the enclaves of british expats throughout the world
plk123 8 | 4,142  
9 Jan 2008 /  #3
i think it's actually the other way around. all kinds of other peoples stick together way more then poles.
krysia 23 | 3,058  
9 Jan 2008 /  #4
They stick together in Chicago, must be using stronger glue there.
Many Laotian and Hmong people in Wisconsin. They stick together like super duper close. They are not afraid to let their children speak another language in public, where Polish people are afraid to speak Polish in public.
OP Doba 1 | 73  
9 Jan 2008 /  #5
Yeah Im with Krysia I think it all depends on where you live, In Canada and USA where its so multicultural people tend to stick together, Mississauga, Ontario is the same way I think, stronger glue as she said.

I think I need to visit Chicago... too bad the Blackhawks suck but the Polish clubs might be nice.
osiol 55 | 3,921  
9 Jan 2008 /  #6
just look at the enclaves of british expats throughout the world

I think I'd rather not. If I'm in Poland, the last thing I think I want to see is another Briton, especially if they're English - I have the feeling it would diminish my novelty value status.

The Poles I know or have known in the United Kingdom of... have either all stuck together if they intend to go back home after a while, or completely go it alone if their intention is to stay here.
plk123 8 | 4,142  
9 Jan 2008 /  #7
They stick together in Chicago, must be using stronger glue there.

true but i think other ethnicities stick together more.. the polish area in chicago has been thinnning for years.
Davey 13 | 388  
9 Jan 2008 /  #8
Well of the small Polish community here, all the Polish people know each other.
Wulkan - | 3,212  
9 Jan 2008 /  #9
where Polish people are afraid to speak Polish in public

thx God I dont live in US !
plk123 8 | 4,142  
9 Jan 2008 /  #10
we're very glad that you're not here too. :)

there is no reason to be affraid.. i have never, ever had an issue like that. some people are just weird.
Seanus 15 | 19,674  
9 Jan 2008 /  #11
Let's put it this way, they don't stick together like Japanese do. They are joined at the hip. My girl was in Britain and she felt that Poles tried to cheat one another. They drift apart when abroad which is weird. On the other hand, there are clubs where Poles can learn English together and integrate more fully and, from what I've heard, the level of participation is quite high. Overall, I'd say that Poles feel a certain comfort in being with fellow countrymen. Asides from some exceptions, they feel uncomfortable using foreign languages and prefer to stick together.
isthatu 3 | 1,164  
9 Jan 2008 /  #12
In Canada and USA where its so multicultural people tend to stick together

How on earth can you claim to be "multi cultural" then if every group seems to be ghettoised?

have either all stuck together if they intend to go back home after a while, or completely go it alone if their intention is to stay here

Pretty much my experiance too Donkey ,my ex used to hate it when she would hear or spot another Pole in the supermarket say and people Ive worked with have been the same,of course they would often get together in little groups for a chat po polsku but on the whole the ones who plan on staying make more of an effort to integrate fully .Which seems entirely logical,why make ties you are just going to sever?
Matyjasz 2 | 1,544  
9 Jan 2008 /  #13
One of the most visible heritages after the commie times here in Poland is this distrust to other fellow Poles out side of ones family and circle of close friends. Don't trust, everyone can cheat you, steal from you, everyone can be a stitch from the government and turn you in. It was to prevent people to organize themselves. Of course the commies failed (see Solidarność for example) but still the burden remains.
Buddy 7 | 167  
9 Jan 2008 /  #14
Do Polish people tend to stick together?

Yes especially when they huddle up and pour honey overthemselves :)
plk123 8 | 4,142  
9 Jan 2008 /  #15
Let's put it this way, they don't stick together like Japanese do. They are joined at the hip. My girl was in Britain and she felt that Poles tried to cheat one another. They drift apart when abroad which is weird. On the other hand, there are clubs where Poles can learn English together and integrate more fully and, from what I've heard, the level of participation is quite high. Overall, I'd say that Poles feel a certain comfort in being with fellow countrymen. Asides from some exceptions, they feel uncomfortable using foreign languages and prefer to stick together.

One of the most visible heritages after the commie times here in Poland is this distrust to other fellow Poles out side of ones family and circle of close friends. Don't trust, everyone can cheat you, steal from you, everyone can be a stitch from the government and turn you in. It was to prevent people to organize themselves. Of course the commies failed (see Solidarność for example) but still the burden remains.

ding, ding.. you two have the severe case of polofobia. ;) :D
Krzysztof 2 | 973  
9 Jan 2008 /  #16
well, I can't say how it looks today, but when I was abroad to work (in Norway, 1991, so soon after the communism fell down) then the things looked exactly like described by Seanus and Matyjasz.
polishgirltx  
9 Jan 2008 /  #17
Do Polish people tend to stick together?

i don't think so....i don't stick with Polish people...
plk123 8 | 4,142  
9 Jan 2008 /  #18
well, I can't say how it looks today, but when I was abroad to work (in Norway, 1991, so soon after the communism fell down) then the things looked exactly like described by Seanus and Matyjasz.

nothing has changed in 15 years.. this is how it has always been.

i don't think so....i don't stick with Polish people...

whateva' *rolleyes*
Puzzler 9 | 1,088  
10 Jan 2008 /  #19
Polacks

- I hope you don't stick to this forum for long.

i don't think so....i don't stick with Polish people...

- You stick with your own bunch instead?

my ex used to hate it when she would hear or spot another Pole in the supermarket

- Your ex, obviously, is one of those whom we call 'polaczki' - folks who hate their own country and people and so are lost forever to their own nation. I've actually met quite a few British people, especially English, disliking their own country and people. Fear and hatred of own country is a universal phenomenon, isn't it?
the_falkster 1 | 180  
10 Jan 2008 /  #20
from my experience and my (polish) girlfriend's...

i tried to avoid germans in the first two years or so in england, simply because i came here to learn about the culture and the language. it does not help then to meet fellow countrymen and keep on talking your mother tongue...

my girlfriend used to share a house with a polish couple and they were speaking polish at home (quite naturally). since she moved in with me about a year ago her english improved dramatically (even if i am still far from perfect ;-) ).

when i met germans in the supermarket it was strange to suddenly hear your own language but i tend to ignore it... back home i would not start to talk to strangers in a supermarket either. so why should i do so over here? one strange effect: i started guessing peoples education level and nativity by their accent...

for my girlfriend the situation is exactly the same...

i do meet some german friends occasionally but as we are all now for quite some time abroad we are stuck a bit in the english language so that most conversations begin in english and after some time we switch to german...

my girlfriend was seeing more polish people right from the beginning and naturally they communicate in their mother tongue.
we do have more polish friends than german...

i tried at the beginning not to be too much in touch with my family in germany as i wanted to dive into everything english and disappear for a while. in the meantime i appreciate everything 'german' far more than i ever did before.

my girlfriend always had a big connection to her home and family and still misses it... (that's why we will eventually move back to Berlin, so she's closer to Szczecin)

everyone has to understand that when you go somewhere new most people tend tlook out for something familiar and people that share same interests in some field. that is often easier to find with your fellow countrymen. that is valid not only for polish people but for everyone who decides to live somewhere else...

it would be good if everyone could make this experience and we would have far less stupid talk about immigration...
finT 12 | 167  
10 Jan 2008 /  #21
I think Matyjasz is spot on with his observations. Poles in the UK are quite content in their own little circles but are very wary of any other Poles they don't know. When I was working with a team of Polish builders in London a couple of years ago they befriended another team of guys who came round to our flat one night drank our vodka, beer and ate our food and in the wee small hours of the morning the f*****s ran off with all our tools, expensive power tools included!

A Polish girl I spoke to in Scotland recently said that having lived around Poles in the UK for the last few years she has lost respect for her fellow countrymen, for exactly the reasons Matyjasz mentions, and interestingly says she has gained a far greater respect for the increasing Russian community who really do seem to help each other out. I say it is interesting as she also mentioned that in Poland she really believed that Russians were the scum of the earth.
OP Doba 1 | 73  
10 Jan 2008 /  #22
- I hope you don't stick to this forum for long

easy buddy... besides me likey here
southern 74 | 7,074  
10 Jan 2008 /  #23
a far greater respect for the increasing Russian community who really do seem to help each other out.

Let me guess the jobs done by the increasing russian community.
OP Doba 1 | 73  
10 Jan 2008 /  #24
by community are you referring to the Mob :D ( Russian mafia FTL)
ShelleyS 14 | 2,893  
10 Jan 2008 /  #25
everyone has to understand that when you go somewhere new most people tend tlook out for something familiar and people that share same interests in some field. that is often easier to find with your fellow countrymen. that is valid not only for polish people but for everyone who decides to live somewhere else..

Couldnt have put it better myself and I think anyone who says they wouldnt want contact with people of their own nationality whilst living in a foreign country is talking complete tosh!
OP Doba 1 | 73  
10 Jan 2008 /  #26
Absolutely, its the biggest part about coming to Poland, automatically you realize you’re among your own and its a good feeling. Then the plane lands back in Canada I walk in the airport and see nothing but Pakis, and Chinese.. its like a big Welcome Home sign… back to reality
isthatu 3 | 1,164  
10 Jan 2008 /  #27
Your ex, obviously, is one of those whom we call 'polaczki' - folks who hate their own country

You really can be an arrogent feker puzzler,she and her family were solidarnosc workers,her family fought in the 44 uprising,she has nothing to prove about her love for Poland.You on the other hand seem to hate all Poles who are not as paranoid as you,shame really.

I am fast losing respect for you,especially when you come out with rude,arogent ,demeaning comments about someone you do not know. Can I ask what you have ever done for Poland apart from not live there for half your life?

Can I also ask what qualifications you hold to be the Arbiter of who is a good Pole or some paranoid "hater",coz,not being funny,you seem to be the one doubled over with a loathing of your countrymen?

By your logic you must be one of the biggest "polonophobes " around seeing as you have spent most of your life trying to live in other countries..........
plk123 8 | 4,142  
10 Jan 2008 /  #28
I think anyone who says they wouldnt want contact with people of their own nationality whilst living in a foreign country is talking complete tosh!

then put the dunce cap back on please.

isthatu

pwned!! :D :D
osiol 55 | 3,921  
10 Jan 2008 /  #29
anyone who says they wouldnt want contact with people of their own nationality whilst living in a foreign country is talking complete tosh!

That's if you think nationality really gives everyone some vital connection to who they are above all the other things that make us individuals. Nationality is such a tiny part of life.
Dice 15 | 452  
10 Jan 2008 /  #30
Do Polish people tend to stick together?

I think they do, especially the ones who do not learn the language or have some other difficulties assimilating to the new culture.

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