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Damn proud of being (half) Polish


Patrycja19 62 | 2,688  
5 Jan 2008 /  #32
taking pride in something one hasn't done or contributed to is a form of delusional thinking imho

if I say, my dad served in WWII, I am proud of his accimplishments

Where or how and WHat part of this sentence is so dilusional that I have no right to
make this statement?? SHow me where I take his pride away????
he did it, I state he did it.. I am proud of my father, therefore I am proud of the
man he is/was and what he did so that I am alive....

you are dilusional..... imho
Foreigner4 12 | 1,768  
5 Jan 2008 /  #33
WHat part of this sentence is so dilusional that I have no right to
make this statement?? SHow me where I take his pride away????

^show me where i wrote that, that doesn't even make any sense, if i wrote that then i gotta lay off the medication. *shrugs shoulders, pops 3x more pills than recommended*

anyway i've noticed it's more the way and when people typically state these things (i believe the word "brag" was used in one of your other posts) that is veiled psuedo strutting (e.g. look at me, my greatgrandfather was a war hero), or even why you'd feel the need to "announce" such a thing- it just defies humility.

anyway i *don't think you'll get it* (edited) and i can see from this post as compared to your others that your getting worked up about the whole thing.
Patrycja19 62 | 2,688  
5 Jan 2008 /  #34
or even why you'd feel the need to "announce" such a thing- it just defies humility.

in a conversation , if someone says my father served WWII or WWI and told of his
heroics, he is carrying on the memories of his familys accomplishments, one should
be remembered , especially after they have passed along, and its ok to say he is
proud and or admire in your statement, none of its wrong in my opinion, your just
being anal and trying to dip into the human psych of it all but your argument holds
no merit, because you know as well as I do that the only person who is having
the problems with it is you ( on a personal level).... so go ahead and anal-ize
what you want.. have fun..

I wish you would come back down like you did yesterday, I really thought that was
mighty gallant..
omniba  
5 Jan 2008 /  #35
no.

Well surprise, surprise - some people are! And seeing the antonym of "ashamed" is "proud" it follows that some people can be proud of their parents, etc.

Pride doesn't necessarily, and exclusively, lead to nationalism, though of course it might. Pride can lead to behaving better so as not to let the side down, and surely that cannot be a bad thing.
Foreigner4 12 | 1,768  
5 Jan 2008 /  #36
funny cause i'm not surprised in the least by that reply.

just because some people allow themselves to feel trapped by feelings of remorse for things that were beyond their control doesn't make it healthy thinking and i'd certainly never advocate it. Take pride of the things you've done man there's nothing wrong with that. but remember that pride comes before the fall.
omniba  
5 Jan 2008 /  #37
You mean before Autumn? :)
Patrycja19 62 | 2,688  
5 Jan 2008 /  #38
just because some people allow themselves to feel trapped by feelings of remorse for things that were beyond their control

take your own advice, your remorseful for something beyond your control which
is pride/being proud.. your actually telling others how you feel in another thread
about this same peticular subject..

polishforums.com/sick_people_being_proud_they_x-16_16322_0.html

your sick with remorse? why let it bother you so much, that leads to health issues
and of course we dont want that now do we ..
Foreigner4 12 | 1,768  
5 Jan 2008 /  #39
You mean before Autumn? :)

:)
Guest  
4 Apr 2009 /  #40
i know how you feel i feel the same way about my polish blood.do you know any polish?
glaswegians  
4 Apr 2009 /  #41
You do not have polish blood. There is no such thing as polish blood. the poles are not a race of people. There is no differance racially between a pole, brit, german etc. They all belong to the same european caucasian racial group.

The poles are not defined as a race anthropologically

The poles like all european nationalisities are seperated by language, culture, geography and community.

You cannot be half german or half polish, you are either polish or not.
HatefulBunch397 - | 658  
4 Apr 2009 /  #42
Hey glas, I read your post and have to say, that's very well put! I agree with it too. It's more about language and culture, but underneath that pretense, everyone's pretty much the same, all human. Wise post, glas!
theblueenigma 3 | 188  
4 Apr 2009 /  #43
You cannot be half german or half polish, you are either polish or not.

One of the more sensible posts Ive read here this afternoon, well done
Bratwurst Boy 12 | 11,831  
4 Apr 2009 /  #44
But still wrong!

You can very well be a "mixed breed" and live in those two cultures, speaking two languages, feeling at home with it.
There are alot of German/Poles around...there always were...of course the war years and the strong antagonism over long years between Germany and Poland put a strain on those mixes, they often were forced to decide and to forget or to deny the other half.

But the real actual world with both countries now in economic and military alliances, with open borders etc. will put that to rest and you will see alot of more of thos mixes again.

And how do you call someone who grows up with both cultures and isn't forced to deny one?
Of course he is half German and half Pole! :)

PS: Did you know that the polish minority in Germany is as big as the turkish one?
Ask me which I prefer!

Turks 2 Mill
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turks_in_Germany

Poles 2-3 Mill
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish_minority_in_Germany
Seanus 15 | 19,674  
4 Apr 2009 /  #45
I agree, BB. You need to get into other classifications such as citizenship, nationality and habitual residence. For example, I regard Tiger Woods as half-Asian as that what his 'bloodlines' lead to. Still, he is regarded as an American citizen. From his father's side, he is. He was also born in America. That still doesn't change the fact that he has mixed bloodlines and is half-Asian (Chinese and Thai).
Bratwurst Boy 12 | 11,831  
4 Apr 2009 /  #46
That still doesn't change the fact that he has mixed bloodlines and is half-Asian (Chinese and Thai).

I always thought he is half black....
HatefulBunch397 - | 658  
4 Apr 2009 /  #47
You two misunderstand. What glas is saying is: You have your culture and language but underneath those, you are a caucasian. A german and a pole are the same as a scot or a frenchman. They are all the same race, they just speak different languages and have different customs.
Bratwurst Boy 12 | 11,831  
4 Apr 2009 /  #48
We are all white native Europeans you mean?

Whoa...sometimes you get called a racist just for admitting there is such a thing:

miss-polonia-deutschland.de/pl/index.htm
Seanus 15 | 19,674  
4 Apr 2009 /  #49
HB, what's a Cablinasian? Please tell me

BB, Tiger is part African-American and part Native-American Indian. He also has Dutch blood in him.
Bratwurst Boy 12 | 11,831  
4 Apr 2009 /  #50
BB, Tiger is part African-American and part Native-American Indian. He also has Dutch blood in him.

A real US mix then...:)
Seanus 15 | 19,674  
4 Apr 2009 /  #51
That's what I was thinking :) We are Caucasians, they just cocked Asians ;)
HatefulBunch397 - | 658  
4 Apr 2009 /  #52
HB, what's a Cablinasian?

Is that a mixture of every race on earth? lol I have no idea what it is.
Seanus 15 | 19,674  
4 Apr 2009 /  #53
CAucasian, BLack, INdian and ASIAN. This is what the American Tiger Woods regards himself as.
Seanus 15 | 19,674  
4 Apr 2009 /  #55
HB, if you are born in China, are you Chinese?
HatefulBunch397 - | 658  
4 Apr 2009 /  #56
Seanus why are you asking me this redundant question? I didn't create nationalism, you know.
Being born in China wouldn't necessarily make you Chinese. You need to know the language and the culture. That's why we say "Asian" over here, Seanus. We don't call people Chinese or Vietnamese. We just call them "Asian".
Seanus 15 | 19,674  
4 Apr 2009 /  #57
Why is it redundant? OK, let's say I know the language and culture like I do Japanese. Does that make me Japanese? So you prefer to give their race, fair enough. We prefer to state their country for the most part.
HatefulBunch397 - | 658  
4 Apr 2009 /  #58
This is my theory. Let's pretend for a moment. Your parents moved from Scotland to Japan because your father found work with a Japanese company. Don't know how often that happens, but let's pretend. Let's say you were born in Japan, you were raised speaking Japanese as your native language, you know how to fit into Japanese society, you know Japanese history, you are emmersed in this location and the history and language of the people who live on this island we call Japan.

Do you have the right to call yourself Japanese even though you aren't mongolian? I think you do. I think you should have the right to say you are Japanese because their life is all you know, you speak their language, know all about living there and what it takes to fit in.
Seanus 15 | 19,674  
4 Apr 2009 /  #59
All I've known over the last few years has been Polish and things Polish. I've read a lot and know the language. Does that make me Polish?
HatefulBunch397 - | 658  
4 Apr 2009 /  #60
It's not quite the same. It depends. If you are raised in a country it's easier to call yourself Japanese or American or whatever. If you move at the age of 20 or whatever, you are more than likely always going to have the identity of where you were raised. The Polish are going to call you Scottish no matter what even though they might say Scottish-Polish to humor you or call you honorary Polish so you'll feel more included.

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