Return PolishForums LIVE
  PolishForums Archive :
Archives - 2005-2009 / Language  % width 24

Jest/To jest - to jest is often abbreviated to just to


SzwedwPolsce 11 | 1,595  
2 Jun 2009 /  #1
It's obvious that to jest is often abbreviated to just to. (e.g. To świetna piosenka!)

But in a sentence like:
"X is Y" (where X is a noun and Y is an adjective)
the word "is" is sometimes translated into just jest and sometimes into to jest (often abbreviated to just to).

Examples of the 2 constructions:
1. Samochód jest biały.
2. Kolokwium to (jest) dużo pracy.

So when are you supposed to use just jest, and when to use to (=to jest)? In a sentence that begins with a noun. Of course "to" can be a substitute for the noun, but that's not the kind of sentences that I mean now.

Thanks in advance!
gumishu 11 | 5,763  
2 Jun 2009 /  #2
seems quite obvious

Somochód to jest biały does not make sense

to jest (in this case) can be translated also as equals (or implies)

Kolokwium = dużo pracy

Kolokwium jest dużo pracy - does not make sense in Polish as well

it could if you would put a dot inbetween - Kolokwium. Jest dużo pracy. - but it is not the way the language is spoken everyday - this would work only as some specific literary style

Samochód does not equal biały - it just is white - an that's it ;)

what follows is (or another form of verb be) here is some quality of the subject
OP SzwedwPolsce 11 | 1,595  
2 Jun 2009 /  #3
to jest (in this case) can be translated also as equals (or implies)

Thanks! That makes more sense. I guess in English there is not such a difference.
Ziemowit 13 | 4,497  
3 Jun 2009 /  #4
I guess in English there is not such a difference.

Some other examples for you to contemplate the problem:
1. (a) Życie jest cudem. (b) Życie to [jest] cud.
2. (a) Tomek jest komunistą. (b) Tomek to [jest] komunista.
3. (a) Kolokwium jest (wiąże się z) intensywną pracą. (b) Kolokwium to [jest] dużo pracy.
4. (a) Samochód jest biały. (b) Samochód, którym jechałem, był białą limuzyną.
5. "Na początku było słowo, i słowo było u Boga i Bogiem było Słowo." (The Bible, J.1,1)
z_darius 14 | 3,968  
5 Jun 2009 /  #6
Somochód to jest biały does not make sense

It does make sense depending on the context (except for the spelling of the first word).
gumishu 11 | 5,763  
6 Jun 2009 /  #7
yes Darek but it is such an unusual context and such a colloquial one one should not actually feed it to foreigners learning Polish - it would just cause confusion

anyway I have to admit I didn't think of such a context while writing that message
Michal - | 1,865  
7 Jun 2009 /  #8
Maybe 'a samochod? On jest biały.' sounds right or at least better here.
z_darius 14 | 3,968  
8 Jun 2009 /  #9
This is not the same meaning.
And

right or at least better

sounds hilarious :)
tomekcatkins 8 | 130  
8 Jun 2009 /  #10
Kolokwium jest dużo pracy - does not make sense in Polish as well

Why doesn't it makes sense? To me it reads as 'The test is a lot of work.'.
'Kolokwium to dużo pracy.' would I translate with 'The test, (well) that's a lot of work!'.
Ziemowit 13 | 4,497  
8 Jun 2009 /  #11
Kolokwium jest dużo pracy - doesn't make sense because the full sentence will read "kolokwium to jest dużo pracy", and the only possible abbreviation of this sentence will be omitting the word "jest" in it, and not omitting the word "to".

"Samochód to jest biały" is a sentence in which the word order has been reversed to a highly unusual one (if ever, it may be found in poetry or in a theatre play). Its proper and very simple version will be: To jest biały samochód.

A very good example of an unnecessary change in word order can be found in Molier's comedy play of 1667 "Le burgeois gentillhomme" ("Mieszczanin szlachcicem"):

----------------------
PAN JOURDAIN:
A teraz muszę się Panu zwierzyć z jedną rzeczą. Kocham się w pewnej bardzo wysoko postawionej osobie i pragnąłbym, abyś mi pomógł napisać bilecik, który chciałbym upuścić u jej stóp. [...] Pragnąłbym napisać więc w owym bilecku: "Piękna markizo, twoje piękne oczy sprawiły, iż umieram dla ciebie z miłości", ale chciałbym, aby to wyrazić w sposób doborowy, żeby to było jakoś zgrabnie powiedziane. [...]

NAUCZYCIEL FILOZOFII:
Można wyrazić po pierwsze tak, jak Pan to powiedziałeś: "Piękna markizo, twoje piękne oczy sprawiły, iż umieram dla ciebie z miłości". Albo: "Iż z miłości umieram dla ciebie, twoje piękne oczy sprawiły, piękna markizo". Albo: "Sprawiły piękne oczy twoje, iż z miłości, piękna markizo, umieram dla ciebie." Albo: "Oczy twoje, iż umieram, piękna markizo, dla ciebie z miłości, sprawiły." Albo: "Dla ciebie, piękna markizo, iż umieram, sprawiły twoje piękne oczy, z miłości."

PAN JOURDAIN: Ale z tych wszystkich sposobów, któryż jest najlepszy?

NAUCZYCIEL FILOZOFII: Ten, którego Pan użyłeś: "Piękna markizo, twoje piękne oczy sprawiły, iż umieram dla ciebie z miłości."
gumishu 11 | 5,763  
8 Jun 2009 /  #12
gumishu:
Kolokwium jest dużo pracy - does not make sense in Polish as well

Why doesn't it makes sense? To me it reads as 'The test is a lot of work.'.
'Kolokwium to dużo pracy.' would I translate with 'The test, (well) that's a lot of work!'.

it simply does not in Polish Tomek. You should not tranlate anything literally - it often creates gibberish - no matter what direction you translate. I'm not in the shape to search for logical background (it must be subtle if there is any) between the differences in Polish and English construction)
Switek - | 59  
8 Jun 2009 /  #13
"Kolokwium to dużo pracy" is not proper according to general rules of Polish language but is a kind of "living" language, common usage, just to make communication much simply. And I guess, is accepted by Polish linguists anyway,

Formally, proper sentence should be expressed in Polish in following way:

"Przygotowanie się do kolokwium wymaga dużo pracy"
z_darius 14 | 3,968  
9 Jun 2009 /  #14
"Kolokwium to dużo pracy" is not proper according to general rules of Polish language

It is proper. The construct is called Równoważnik zdania.

Formally, proper sentence should be expressed in Polish in following way:

"Przygotowanie się do kolokwium wymaga dużo pracy"

The meaning of this sentence is not the same as "Kolokwium to dużo pracy". Your sentence refers to the preparation for an action, the latter to the actual action.
Switek - | 59  
9 Jun 2009 /  #15
Ok...

Anyway both logically mean the same...
ender 5 | 398  
8 Nov 2009 /  #16
let me try
samochód jest biały/the car is white
niebo jest niebieskie/the sky is blue
woda jest niebieska/water is wet
southern jest agresywny/southern is aggressive
kolokwium jest pracowite/test is laborious

above is simple
problem we got here
sentencese are abusurdal but correct (not in english)
samochód jest bielą/the car is whiteness
niebo jest niebieskością/sky is blueness
woda jest mokrością/water is wetness
southern jest agresorem/souhern is aggressor
kolokwium jest pracą/test is labour

in fact u can use
kolokwium to jest ciężka praca
but you need to put accent/excalmation on to and in my opinion to avoid such a passion ( :-) ) and keep your voice flat

Tusk tojest (dopiero) kretyn. What a moron is Tusk
Tusk to kretyn/ Tusk is moron
Bocian jest głównie biały/Stork is mainly white.
Bocian to ptak/Stork is bird.
Bocian to nie jest ssak./Stork is not bird.
Stork to nie ssak./Stork is not mammal.
Kolokwium to praca, praca, praca.
OP SzwedwPolsce 11 | 1,595  
8 Nov 2009 /  #17
We can summarize it as:

1. Noun jestadjective
Rower jest nowy.

2. Noun to (jest) noun
Życie to cud.

The 2nd form also applies to:
Noun to (jest) adjective + noun.
ender 5 | 398  
9 Nov 2009 /  #18
correct
gumishu 11 | 5,763  
9 Nov 2009 /  #19
2. Noun to (jest) noun
Życie to cud.

and what about : życie cudem jest? mój wujek jest inżynierem? ;)
OP SzwedwPolsce 11 | 1,595  
9 Nov 2009 /  #20
ok.. hehe, except from instrumental case expresssions. maybe my rule isn't perfect, but all rules have their exceptions.
ender 5 | 398  
9 Nov 2009 /  #21
You good ;-) I just came to finish
so it's always noun ALWAYS jest adj (when u describ it)
SzwedWPolsce jest medykiem. (it's a statment)
but
SzwedWPolsce to jest medyk. (I'm judging/accusing you, I'm implaying you are great in what you doing, I'm impresed it's up to my tone of corurs-it could be sarcastic)

now goody one
SzewdWPolsce jest medykiem. SzwedWPolsce to medyk.
In common both means the same, but because 'SzwedWPolsce to medyk.' came from (let say so) from 'SzwedWPolsce to jest medyk.' It's carry mild form of judgment/accusation. Shortly use of to is bit stronger then use of jest.

życie cudem [/b]jest[b]. życie jest cudem. życie to jest cud
1. życie cudem jest - it's not grammary correct form but it's quiet popular in poems or songs sounds cool and anciet and sounds stronger then regular form accent/modulation on jest.

2. życie jest cudem. regular for and it's statment.
3. życie to jest cud. judmental sentence I'm impresed
4. życie to cud. milder form previous sentence

mój wujek jest inżynierem. (he is an engineer- so what? :-)
mój wujek inżynierem jest (I don't know but it's asking to be sung)
mój wujek to jest (dopiero) inżynier (he is great egineer)
mój wujek to inżynier (milder form of previous one close to jest)

now
kolokwium to dużo pracy

kolokwium jest dużą pracą (grammary correct form but I don't what the hell is this praca is loosing sens of doing something to product (creation)

correct sentence with the same meaning is
kolokwium wiąże się z dużą ilością pracy

kolokwium tp jest dużo pracy (correct)
kolokwum to dużo pracy (correct a lot)
kolokwium to dużo pracy jest (it's asking for singing)

of course that is not all
gumishu 11 | 5,763  
10 Nov 2009 /  #22
1. życie cudem jest - it's not grammary correct form but it's quiet popular in poems or songs sounds cool and anciet and sounds stronger then regular form accent/modulation on jest.

it is absolutely grammatically correct - Polish language doesn't have a compulsory word order - this word order is simply not the established one (established meaning most commonly used) - but changing the word order here does not affect the meaning (not in this case - it only seldom does in general) - it just sort of shifts the focus of the sentence.
ender 5 | 398  
10 Nov 2009 /  #23
so it's always and only jest when you describe basic noun (3rd form)
using simple adj. or (uncuntable, plural) form of nouns who becomes adj. (and sentence
samples
mój samochód jest (jaki?) biały. (my car is white)
niebo jest (jakie) pełne gwiazd. (sky is full of stars)
życie jest (jakie) cudowne. (life is wonderfull)
życie jest (jakie) pełne cudów. (life is full miracles)
rzeka jest (jaka) pełna wody. (river is full of water)
rower jest (jaki) nowy. (bike is new)
polski język jest (jaki) prosty. (polish language is simple)
polski jest (jaki) pełen nieregularności
and to/to jest u using for rest of things like:

mój wujek jest inżynierm
mój wujek jest dobrym inżynierem (!singular form of describing noun) so:
mój wujek to dobry iżynier

Proxima Centauri jest gwiadą
Poxima Centauri jest jasną gwiazdą
Proxima Centauri to jasna gwiazda.

polski jest prosty

it is absolutely grammatically correct - Polish language doesn't have a compulsory word order - this word order is simply not the established one (established meaning most commonly used) - but changing the word order here does not affect the meaning (not in this case - it only seldom does in general) - it just sort of shifts the focus of the sentence

it's ablosolutly not, absoloutly correct. polish might be not so strict as ennglish or german about word order but it's strict enough to not allow you use this kind of order freely. Even in common conversation if would start talking this way to poeple could get some strange looks.

szyk przestawny to środek wyrazu literackiego
Można w ograniczonym zakresie zmieniać kolejność wyrazów, w celu przeniesienia akcentu logicznego, np. "Nie jest to poprawnie wyrażone w języku polskim zdanie", ale nie wszędzie brzmi to "miłodźwięcznie".
gumishu 11 | 5,763  
10 Nov 2009 /  #24
"Nie jest to poprawnie wyrażone w języku polskim zdanie",

To nie jest poprawnie wyrażone zdanie w języku polskim.
Poprawnie wyrażone zdanie w języku polskim to nie jest.
To nie jest, w języku polskim, poprawnie wyrażone zdanie.

well you are actually right you can't just change places of any part of this sentence for it to retain the meaning if not sense at all.

still simpler sentences like that Życie jest cudem. can be almost turned around in every possible way (in a literary fashion)

Archives - 2005-2009 / Language / Jest/To jest - to jest is often abbreviated to just toArchived