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Has the influx of returning migrants who speak English affected Polish?


Sbrennan 1 | -  
1 Sep 2009 /  #1
I know a lot of people who came to the UK and Ireland to work are now returning home. I was wondering what kind of impact tha's had on the Polish language. Is it further eroding efforts to preserve the purity of the language? Is there any snobbery towards returning migrants because of their use of English?
tornado2007 11 | 2,274  
1 Sep 2009 /  #2
Is there any snobbery towards returning migrants because of their use of English?

I assume that when the Polish are in Poland, they speak Polish, i've mentioned about English in Poland to a few of my Polish friends. They tell me that it does not enter their minds to use it when they are back home in Poland, they may use it if they are speaking to an English friend on the phone or over the internet etc etc

Surely the use of English in Poland is minimal, i'm guessing its used mainly to talk to English people who are in Poland or at schools where English is taught as a language.
OsiedleRuda  
2 Sep 2009 /  #3
There's been a lot of English influence on Polish in recent times, but the Polish media is probably as responsible as returning immigrants. All this "idziemy na castingi i pozniej na drinki i hot dogi i to bedzie super"*** stuff is getting a little out of hand.

But if you think that's bad, what about all these white kids in the UK who think they're black? I've never met a black who thought it would be cool to try and sound Polish, lol.

***ok so that's a ridiculous example, but anyone who watches Polish TV will know what I mean ;)
tornado2007 11 | 2,274  
2 Sep 2009 /  #4
But if you think that's bad, what about all these white kids in the UK who think they're black?

i know its shocking!!!!
SzwedwPolsce 11 | 1,595  
2 Sep 2009 /  #5
idziemy na castingi i pozniej na drinki i hot dogi i to bedzie super

Hahaha... this is so true. Throw in a few English nouns in the sentence and add Polish endings.
frd 7 | 1,399  
2 Sep 2009 /  #6
"idziemy na castingi i pozniej na drinki i hot dogi i to bedzie super"

I think you're overexaggerating, these words were in use long before uk miggrations. Moreover I think that the process is taking place in most of europan (if not world) countries.

Is it further eroding efforts to preserve the purity of the language?

I'd say that many people living abroad stuck together in their little communities thus restricting their contact with the language.
OsiedleRuda  
2 Sep 2009 /  #7
I think you're overexaggerating, these words were in use long before uk miggrations.

but the Polish media is probably as responsible as returning immigrants

ok so that's a ridiculous example

;)
Lyzko  
4 Sep 2009 /  #8
I realize this is more or less unrelated, but how about considering the converse of how migrants to the UK over the last decade or so who speak Polish has affected English?

Even when I was teenager during the late '70's in London, I heard a Polish gentleman affecting a Cockney accent and appropriating Britishisms right and left......all with a Polish accent one could cut with a machete:

GAWTT BLAJMII, AI TINK DOT YOO DEET AH BLAHDII GOOT TSCHAWP!

'Translation' - God Blimey, I think ye did a bloody good job!
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
4 Sep 2009 /  #9
Language is such a mind expanding thing, look at it as another part of the tool set which gives you the competitive edge. Poland wasn't unduly fazed by the so-called crisis and has been attracting a lot of inward investment for some time. By virtue of knowing sth, it doesn't mean it will always be at the forefront of your mind. If the lucky few pick up a plum job with an international firm, fair play to them. The others can use their English in different ways.

There has been a concerted drive in the last few years to improve their English. This has largely continued unabated as more and more people sign up to English courses. Some of my students have told me that they are happy with their English level but just want to remain in contact with the language. Hats off to them. My Japanese has become weaker but I just need the right triggers and contact.

The point is, they are Polish and will always think in Polish.
Lyzko  
4 Sep 2009 /  #10
Seems then, Seanus, that Polish migrants are to Londoners much as Hispanic immigrants are to New Yorkers:-)
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
4 Sep 2009 /  #11
Now you are talking about value judgements. You take from a different culture what you want. It is no secret that Londoners perceive Poles, generally, as sth less than themselves but, then again, that rings true for most Brits too.

Poland is a country of association and it will take a long time, and education, for people to see Poland for the emerging force that it is. The level of medical care is high, as is IT, the technologies of tomorrow. Let the facts speak for themselves and for stereotypes to remain only that.
Lyzko  
6 Sep 2009 /  #12
Amen!

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