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Giving directions in Polish


osiol  
15 Sep 2007 /  #1
I know a few words: prawo / lewo / prosto, but
how can I string these to give directions to someone?

Take the left, second turning on the right, over the roundabout, past the factory.
You've gone too far. Turn round and go back the way you came!
Left at the roundabout, then there's another left immediately after that.

From that, I can probably work out how to get this one sorted!
Michal  
15 Sep 2007 /  #2
over the roundabout, past the factory.

Over the roundabout is probably po rondie and past the factory is przez fabryke
you have gone too far is probably pan pojechal juz za daleko
left at the roundabout, then there's another left immediately after that may be do ronda i skrec na lewo i potem natychmiast jeszcze raz na lewo?

Take the left may be pierwsza ulica na lewo
second turning on the right druga ulica na prawo

Someone will correct my mistakes!

Turn round and go back the way you came!

pan musi tu po prostu skrecic i wrocic jak pan przyjechal it sounds more or less right anyway!

past the factory.

As a P.S. there is a very useful Polish word 'wzdluz' pronounced wzdwoosh meaning along so if it was a very long wall of a factory running like a tram line for a kilometer ect it could be wzdluz fabryki taking the genetive case.
Ronek  
15 Sep 2007 /  #3
Take the left, second turning on the right, over the roundabout, past the factory.
You've gone too far. Turn round and go back the way you came!
Left at the roundabout, then there's another left immediately after that.

Idź w lewo, potem druga w prawo, przez rondo, obok fabryki.
Poszedłeś za daleko. Zawróć i idź skąd przyszedłeś.
Lewo na rondzie i następnie zaraz w lewo.
Krzysztof  
15 Sep 2007 /  #4
Ronek, that's a walking version, now for drivers please :)
Ronek  
15 Sep 2007 /  #5
you do it, i'm lazzy;)
Michal  
15 Sep 2007 /  #6
obok fabryki.

Obok fabryki is really next to the factory (standing) rather than a sense of movement as passing it would be.
OP osiol  
15 Sep 2007 /  #7
Ronek, that's a walking version, now for drivers please :)

Next direction: Park the car, get out and walk the last four miles!

Can idź not count for being in a car? I thought it could mean walk or go.

What verb suits driving? (I'll be giving directions to a passenger - I couldn't make anyone use their phone whilst driving.)
Ronek  
15 Sep 2007 /  #8
Can idź not count for being in a car?

jedź

Park the car, get out and walk the last four miles!

Zaparkuj samochód i ostatnie 4 mile przejdź na pieszo.
Michal  
15 Sep 2007 /  #9
What verb suits driving? (I'll be giving directions to a passeng

prowadzic samochod
OP osiol  
15 Sep 2007 /  #10
I could try to use all of the above, but it might be obvious to the listener that I'm reading it from a piece of paper or the computer screen.

I'll keep it simple by using flashcards or something.

Thanks all.
porta  
15 Sep 2007 /  #11
One can use the verb "Iść" can be used for traveling to spesific locations right? Like going to the store and such? Even if you go by transportation?
OP osiol  
15 Sep 2007 /  #12
jedź

Should I put this in the second person plural?
Something like jedźicie?
porta  
15 Sep 2007 /  #13
How many are you talking to?
OP osiol  
15 Sep 2007 /  #14
The passenger. There will be a driver.
My first guess is keep it in the singular,
but the Polish language seems to like being difficult!
porta  
15 Sep 2007 /  #15
Singular:
Ja(I) jadę
ty(you) jedziesz
on/pan(he) jedzie
ona/pani(she) jedzie
ono (it) jedzie

Plural:
My(we) jedziemy
wy(you) jedziecie
On/panowie/panstwo. jadą
One(panie) jadą

If i remember correctly that is. I think "jedziesz" is correct when talking to a person ,but if you use pan or pani then you use "jedzie". But please get this confimed from someone else :D
OP osiol  
15 Sep 2007 /  #16
I think "jedziesz" is correct when talking to a person ,but if you use pan or pani then you use "jedzie".

That fits with what I know about Polish verbs,
but then, what do I know?
Michal  
15 Sep 2007 /  #17
One can use the verb "Iść" can be used for traveling to spesific locations right? Like going to the store and such? Even if you go by transportation?

Certainly on a colloquial level the verb odchodzic is used to describe trains leaving the station.

If i remember correctly that is. I think "jedziesz" is correct when talking to a person ,but if you use pan or pani then you use "jedzie". But please get this confimed from someone else :D

Yes

One can use the verb "Iść" can be used for traveling to spesific locations right? Li

Ja ide teraz do domu pieszo. Ja chodze codziennie do sklepow (tez pieszo)
Krzysztof  
15 Sep 2007 /  #18
driving version (singular form of imperative, if you want plural add "-cie" to the verbs in imperative form)

Take the left, second turning on the right, over the roundabout, past the factory.You've gone too far. Turn round and go back the way you came!Left at the roundabout, then there's another left immediately after that.

Skręć w lewo, potem druga w prawo, przez rondo, obok fabryki.
Pojechałeś za daleko.
Zawróć i jedź z powrotem tą samą drogą!
W lewo na rondzie i zaraz potem znowu w lewo.

Park the car, get out and walk the last four miles!

Zaparkuj, wysiądź z samochodu (that's kinda obvious, you could skip this part) i przejdź pieszo ostatnie cztery mile (ostatnie sześć kilometrów)!

Can idź not count for being in a car? I thought it could mean walk or go.What verb suits driving? (I'll be giving directions to a passenger - I couldn't make anyone use their phone whilst driving.)

iść/chodzić - go (by foot), walk
jechać/jeździć - go (by bike, car, train etc.)
lecieć/latać - fly

go to school/work - iść/chodzić do szkoły/pracy (generally, as a main occupation of someone, a student or an employee) - but "jechać" if you mean to go by car//bus etc.

I go to school by tram - Do szkoły jeżdżę tramwajem.
go to the movies - iść do kina (again generally, as a leisure type)
go to the doctor - iść do lekarza
go to hell - iść do diabła (diabeł = devil, not hell)
go to France - jechać do Francji
go to Sicily - jechać na Sycylię
go to the Moon (is it correct in English or do you have to use fly to the Moon?) - polecieć na Księżyc
go for a walk - iść na spacer
how is it going ? - jak leci ?
go and f**k yourself - pie**ol się
OP osiol  
15 Sep 2007 /  #19
fly to the Moon

Fly me to the moon...
Fly is good, go is okay.

Thanks, Krzystof.

pie**ol się

I'm glad you censored that.
We wouldn't want to offend!
Michal  
16 Sep 2007 /  #20
przez rondo, obok fabryki.

Does this mean that to rondo znajduje sie obok faryki or that someone, ktos jedzie obok fabryki in the sense of 'wzdluz' i.e. the whole length of the factory or something? There is a difference. Maybe ominac fabryke is meant here?
Krzysztof  
16 Sep 2007 /  #21
it means rondo first and then passing by the factory
"wzdłuż" is rather literal, it would mean you go just along the walls of the building

it can be used for example in "wzdłuż Wisły" (or generally "wzdłuż rzeki"), "wzdłuż torów" (along/by railway tracks), even "wzdłuż płotu" (along the fence, if the fence is long enough to be considered as a separate architectorial point of reference), but "wzdłuż fabryki" sounds strange
Michal  
16 Sep 2007 /  #22
but "wzdłuż fabryki" sounds strange

That is why I did say if the factory was being referred to as a long long wall rather like a tram line not just a short building. In Poland there were old factories with walls that ran for miles!
OP osiol  
16 Sep 2007 /  #23
"wzdłuż fabryki" sounds strange

I like the sound of the word wzdłuż, but it's not really appropriate for any directions I'll be giving, but I might try to find a way to slip it in!
Michal  
16 Sep 2007 /  #24
Actually, I talked to my wife and she is obviously right as she always is in everything in Polish. She was not at all impressed with my 'przez fabryke' so sorry! It should be jedz sobie prosto po ulicy z fabryka po lewej stronie' or at least words to that effect!
OP osiol  
16 Sep 2007 /  #25
'przez fabryke'

Just go straight through the middle of the factory.
Mind the machinery.
Wyspianska  
16 Sep 2007 /  #26
Osiol, ure not polish, why u start to learn this language

i have to admit im impressed Bravo!
OP osiol  
16 Sep 2007 /  #27
Bravo

Or do you mean Prawo?

Answer: it seemed like a good idea at the time.
German words are too long.
French only sounds nice on a lady.
Portuguese I quite like (the Brazilian dialect), but there's no-one to teach me.
Polish? Well, I accidentally went to Poland a few years ago, and quite like it.
Then I went again this year and really liked it.
Working with Polish people only makes it easier.
And it goes without saying, I'd heard of this girl called Wyspianska, so I had no choice but to learn!

What's Polish for blah blah blah blah blah blah blah!

I know it's not quite related, but I don't think this deserves a thread of it's own.
Wyspianska  
16 Sep 2007 /  #28
oh come on, german is hot
i love to hear it it makes me soo ...
:)

anyway im still shocked u learn polish
OP osiol  
16 Sep 2007 /  #29
There's nothing wrong with German. I have one or two German friends, but I've never had the urge to learn any more than please, thankyou, and guinea pig.

I want to learn Swinka Morska in every language...

Meerschweinchen (German)
Cochon d'Ande (French)
Tangerimalac (Hungarian)
Mochyn cwta (Welsh)
etc.
Wyspianska  
16 Sep 2007 /  #30
oh damn, osiol, i wanna hear how ure screaming something in polish oO

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